Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Getty Center Open Fridays till 9 This Summer

Dusk in the Central Garden at the Getty Center

At sundown in Robert Irwin's Central Garden at the Getty Center

Starting this Friday, June 1, the Getty Center will be open until 9:00 p.m. on Fridays as well as Saturdays. That’s two evenings a week to enjoy Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, which continues through most of the summer, plus Gustav Klimt: The Magic of Line, the first-ever retrospective of Klimt’s drawings, opening July 3.

The Restaurant will be open for dinner on Fridays too, or you can pick up sandwiches, salads, snacks, and drinks at the coffee cart. The Central Garden, which has just reopened following maintenance, is a beautiful (and cool) spot to set up a picnic and enjoy the evening.

But even in Southern California, summer doesn’t last forever: Friday evening hours end on September 21.

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  1. Posted May 29, 2012 at 6:12 pm | Permalink

    Is parking after 5:00 pm on Fridays $15 or $10? Web site explicitly states $10 after 5pm on Saturdays – leaving the reader to believe Friday nights are $15.
    “Parking is $15 per car, but $10 per car after 5:00 p.m. for the Getty Center’s evening hours on Saturdays (when we are open until 9:00 p.m.), as well as for all evening public programming, including music, film, lectures, and other special programs held after 5:00 p.m.”
    Request clarification, please.

    • Annelisa Stephan
      Posted May 30, 2012 at 8:48 am | Permalink

      Hi Paul — Parking is $10 after 5:00 p.m. every day, including this summer’s Friday evening hours. Thanks so much for pointing out this inaccurate wording! It should say “$10 per car after 5:00 p.m. for the Getty Center’s evening hours on Fridays and Saturdays (when we are open until 9:00 p.m.)…” Fixing this now! -Annelisa / Iris editor

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      In the late 1700s, “natural grace” was greatly admired. It meant strictly following etiquette while making it seem easy and effortless.

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