Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Getty Center Open Fridays till 9 This Summer

Dusk in the Central Garden at the Getty Center

At sundown in Robert Irwin's Central Garden at the Getty Center

Starting this Friday, June 1, the Getty Center will be open until 9:00 p.m. on Fridays as well as Saturdays. That’s two evenings a week to enjoy Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, which continues through most of the summer, plus Gustav Klimt: The Magic of Line, the first-ever retrospective of Klimt’s drawings, opening July 3.

The Restaurant will be open for dinner on Fridays too, or you can pick up sandwiches, salads, snacks, and drinks at the coffee cart. The Central Garden, which has just reopened following maintenance, is a beautiful (and cool) spot to set up a picnic and enjoy the evening.

But even in Southern California, summer doesn’t last forever: Friday evening hours end on September 21.

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2 Comments

  1. Posted May 29, 2012 at 6:12 pm | Permalink

    Is parking after 5:00 pm on Fridays $15 or $10? Web site explicitly states $10 after 5pm on Saturdays – leaving the reader to believe Friday nights are $15.
    “Parking is $15 per car, but $10 per car after 5:00 p.m. for the Getty Center’s evening hours on Saturdays (when we are open until 9:00 p.m.), as well as for all evening public programming, including music, film, lectures, and other special programs held after 5:00 p.m.”
    Request clarification, please.

    • Annelisa Stephan
      Posted May 30, 2012 at 8:48 am | Permalink

      Hi Paul — Parking is $10 after 5:00 p.m. every day, including this summer’s Friday evening hours. Thanks so much for pointing out this inaccurate wording! It should say “$10 per car after 5:00 p.m. for the Getty Center’s evening hours on Fridays and Saturdays (when we are open until 9:00 p.m.)…” Fixing this now! -Annelisa / Iris editor

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      Olympian Census #3: Poseidon

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Neptune

      Employment: God of the Sea

      Place of residence: A fancy palace somewhere in the Aegean Sea

      Parents: Cronus and Rhea

      Marital status: Married to Amphitrite, a sea goddess, but had many affairs just like his brother Zeus

      Offspring: Had many children including Triton, Theseus, Orion, Polyphemos and Arion

      Symbol: Trident, horse, and dolphin

      Special talent: Starting earthquakes & Shapeshifting into a horse to pursue women

      Highlights reel:

      • When Goddess Demeter turned into a mare to escape Poseidon’s pursuit, Poseidon also turned into a horse and mated with her, creating a talking horse baby, Arion.
      • Athena became the patron goddess of Athens over Poseidon by giving the city an olive tree, which produced wood, oil, and food. Poseidon had given them a salt-water spring. Nice going, Poseidon.
      • Poseidon cursed Olysseus to wander the seas for 10 years after the Trojan War in revenge for Olysseus blinding his son, the cyclops Poplyphemos.

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      07/27/15

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