Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Getty Center Open Fridays till 9 This Summer

Dusk in the Central Garden at the Getty Center

At sundown in Robert Irwin's Central Garden at the Getty Center

Starting this Friday, June 1, the Getty Center will be open until 9:00 p.m. on Fridays as well as Saturdays. That’s two evenings a week to enjoy Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, which continues through most of the summer, plus Gustav Klimt: The Magic of Line, the first-ever retrospective of Klimt’s drawings, opening July 3.

The Restaurant will be open for dinner on Fridays too, or you can pick up sandwiches, salads, snacks, and drinks at the coffee cart. The Central Garden, which has just reopened following maintenance, is a beautiful (and cool) spot to set up a picnic and enjoy the evening.

But even in Southern California, summer doesn’t last forever: Friday evening hours end on September 21.

Tagged Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

2 Comments

  1. Posted May 29, 2012 at 6:12 pm | Permalink

    Is parking after 5:00 pm on Fridays $15 or $10? Web site explicitly states $10 after 5pm on Saturdays – leaving the reader to believe Friday nights are $15.
    “Parking is $15 per car, but $10 per car after 5:00 p.m. for the Getty Center’s evening hours on Saturdays (when we are open until 9:00 p.m.), as well as for all evening public programming, including music, film, lectures, and other special programs held after 5:00 p.m.”
    Request clarification, please.

    • Annelisa Stephan
      Posted May 30, 2012 at 8:48 am | Permalink

      Hi Paul — Parking is $10 after 5:00 p.m. every day, including this summer’s Friday evening hours. Thanks so much for pointing out this inaccurate wording! It should say “$10 per car after 5:00 p.m. for the Getty Center’s evening hours on Fridays and Saturdays (when we are open until 9:00 p.m.)…” Fixing this now! -Annelisa / Iris editor

Post a Comment

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*
*

  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      #ProvenancePeek: Titian in Boston

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, in the collection of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, is no exception. The MFA carefully details the painting’s Italian provenance on its collection page, but the path of this object even since then is complex.

      Between 1901 and 1907, Portrait of a Man Holding a Book entered the stock of no less than three galleries, purchased from the Italian family who owned it first by Agnew’s in London, then by Trotti in Paris, and then by Cottier in New York (marking its movement from the Old World to the New). A collector purchased it from Cottier, and the painting was held privately for 36 years.

      That collector was Frederick Bayley Pratt (1865–1945), son of Charles Pratt, oil magnate and founder of the Brooklyn Institute that bears his family’s name (incidentally, this writer’s alma mater!). 

      The Knoedler Gallery dealt frequently with members of the Pratt family. A quick peek into the searchable database of Knoedler’s stock books turns up nine instances in which a Pratt (Charles and Mary, Frederick’s parents, or Herbert and John, his brothers) bought works, as well as five instances where they sold works. This Titian portrait is one of those instances. Frederick Pratt sold the work to Knoedler in early April of 1943, and by the 10th, it had been snapped up by the Museum of Fine Arts.

      Knoedler shared the sale with Pinakos, an art-dealing concern owned and operated by Rudolf J. Heinemann. Purchasing works in tandem with other dealers was a widespread practice amongst powerful art galleries of the time; nearly 6,000 records in the Knoedler database had joint ownership.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database that anyone can query for free. You can find this Titian under stock number A2555.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, about 1540, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio). Oil on canvas. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Charles Potter Kling Fund. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; stock and sales books documenting the painting’s sale by M. Knoedler & Co.

      _______

      ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archive at the Getty Research Institute.

      04/29/16

  • Flickr