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The Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative, or OSCI, led by the Getty Foundation, is finding solutions for the complex task of creating museum publications in a free digital format.

Museum Catalogues from Eight Institutions You Can Now Read Online

Another online collections catalogue supported by the Getty Foundation has launched More»

Funerary Vessel with Phrixos on the Ram, 340–310 B.C., Attributed to the Phrixos Group. Created in Ceglie del Campo, Italy, Apulia. Terracotta, 18 1/2 in. diam. Antikensammlung, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius
Antikensammlung, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

Three Ways to Avoid the Freeways: Transport Advice from Apulian Vases

Sick of driving? Hitch a ride on these mythical creatures. More»

Zislin

“I Declare War on All Europe”

A closer look at two propaganda posters from World War I More»

illuminate_featured

Holiday Lights at the Getty Center through January 3

Get sparkly with us this winter with special starry light projections, free hot cider, and luminous exhibitions. More»

Debra Canter and Joe Dyer with donations to the Westside Food Bank

Join the Getty Community in Donating Food for #GivingTuesday

Bring a donation of food on December 2 and we’ll match it. More»

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    Jim Cuno: The Getty in 2014 by the numbers

    2014 by the Numbers

    The year in review, infographic style. More»

    Art News from Around the Web

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      • photo from Tumblr

        ROSE

        This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

        In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

        Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

        The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

        For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

        12/19/14

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