architecture

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Ksours and Kasbahs

Detail of a wall painting in the Residence of the Caid, Kasbah Taourit, Ouarzazate, Morocco
Detail of a wall painting in the Residence of the Caid, Kasbah Taourit, Ouarzazate, Morocco

One of Africa’s most important sites of earthen architecture is the focus of an international conservation project. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Be a Part of “Fuzzy Grids II”

A family builds Fuzzy Grids II at the Getty Center
Building "Fuzzy Grids II" at the Getty Center

Be a part of an oversize living artwork at the Getty Center. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Ada Louise Huxtable Archive

Portrait of Ada Louise Huxtable, 1970s
Photograph by L. Garth Huxtable

Inside the archive of one of the greatest 20th-century writers on architecture. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

10 Features of L.A.’s Union Station Not to Miss

lights_southpatio3blog

The top ten hidden design gems of L.A.’s Union Station. More»

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Posted in Art, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Miniature Getty Center Opens in Philadelphia

Landscape architect's rendering of the Getty Center display at the Philadelphia Flower Show
Landscape architect's rendering of the mini-Getty. Courtesy of Burke Brothers Landscape Design/Build

A landscape designer creates a mini-Getty Center in flowers. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art

Architecture as Art in Culver City

BeehiveHoriz

“Public art can contribute to defining a city’s identity and to unifying its vision,” and buildings contribute to this identity too! More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Dynamic L.A.: Images from the Julius Shulman Photography Archive Now Available

Julius Shulman photographing Case Study House no. 22, West Hollywood, 1960
Julius Shulman photographing Case Study House no. 22, West Hollywood, 1960. Julius Shulman photography archive. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10

6,500 newly digitized images depict the development of Los Angeles architecture across decades. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

What’s in a Wood? How Science Helps to Reveal the Eames’ Vision

The living room in the Eames House after conservation and reinstallation
The living room in the Eames House after conservation and reinstallation of the collection. The floor-to-ceiling wall of beautiful golden wood serves as the stunning backdrop for the room. Getty Conservation Institute

Conservators make an intriguing finding about the wood in the Eames House. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design

Unearthing ‘70s Architecture in L.A.

Cesar Pelli's Pacific Design Center
Kent Kanouse on Flickr, CC BY-NC 2.0

The 1970s are the “missing years” of L.A.’s architectural history. A reappraisal. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Voices

My L.A.: The Once and Future Golden Gate Theater

Golden_Gate_Theater_East_Los_Angeles

Hollow and in disrepair, it embodied the reason I wanted to leave Los Angeles. I was wrong. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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