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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Pictures for Education: The Records of Art Dealer M. Knoedler & Co.

16114v.jpg
Booker T. Washington, 1905–45, Harris & Ewing. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-H25- 14111-B

Booker T. Washington appears in the M. Knoedler archive. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

6 Questions for the Getty’s Institutional Archivist

Nancy Enneking, Head of Institutional Records at the Getty, reviews photographs with her team of institutional archivist.
Nancy Enneking, Head of Institutional Records at the Getty, reviews photographs with her team of institutional archivist.

From a model of the Getty Center to a corrupt floppy disk, it’s all in there. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research

This Just In: The Shunk-Kender Archive

Harry Shunk (left) and Janos Kender in 1961
Harry Shunk (left) and János Kender in 1961 at a dinner for artist Lucio Fontana at La Coupole in Montparnasse, Paris. Photo: Shunk-Kender. The Getty Research Institute, 2014.R.20

The 20th-century art scene, told in photographs. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Correspondence of the Art Dealer M. Knoedler & Co

Portrait of a Woman Praying / Hans Memling
Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu. © Muzeul Naţional Brukenthal

A failed bid for Renaissance masterpieces is revealed in a collection of newly catalogued letters. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Guerrilla Girls Archive

Props used in the Guerrilla Girls' actions: plastic gun, bananas, and gorilla fingers with nail polish
Copyright © Guerrilla Girls, courtesy guerrillagirls.com

Why did art professionals put on gorilla masks and take to the streets? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Meet FRED!

editFRED

What’s used in law enforcement and at the Getty Research Institute? FRED! More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Alphabet Szoup

H is for Haring
H is for Haring

A look inside the artist files of legendary curator Harald Szeemann. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Frederick Hammersley Foundation Donates Archive to the Getty Research Institute

Page from Notebook 3 / Frederick Hammersley
Page from Notebook 3, Frederick Hammersley, 1978. Artwork © Frederick Hammersley Foundation

“Despite their precise lines and construction, Hammersley’s work displays a personal touch, guided by his belief in intuition as an important principle for art making.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Beatrice Monti della Corte and the Americans

Beatrice Monti della Corte (detail) / Alexander Liberman
Beatrice Monti della Corte (detail), 1962, Alexander Liberman. The Getty Research Institute, 2000.R.19

The glamorous owner of the Galleria dell’Ariete in Milan was key to the careers of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, among many others. More»

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Harry Smith’s Archives and Collections Now at the Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith at Allen Ginsberg's Kitchen Table, New York City, 16 June 1988 / Allen Ginsberg
© Allen Ginsberg LLC

Best known for his experimental films and his anthology of American folk music, Harry Smith was a fascinating multidisciplinary artist and avid collector. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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