books

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Publications

“As Inspiration Dictates”: Henri Matisse on Color

Chatting with Matisse

“Through his own unique voice, Matisse and his work come alive in new and unexpected ways.” More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Beware Cupid’s Arrow! French Print Reveals Dangers of Romantic Mix-Ups

Detail of the Exchange of Arrows Between Death and Cupid / Pierre Landry
Unlikely.

It could happen to you: comic mix-ups, near-death encounters, and other tales of accursed romance from French prints at the Getty Research Institute. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Ancient World, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Overpromise, Lie, and Other Questionable Political Advice from 64 B.C.

Portrait of Marcus Tullius Cicero with political campaign button

If Karl Rove had lived in ancient Rome, he might have written something like Commentariolum Petitiones, a down-and-dirty electioneering guide from 64 B.C. just published in English by Princeton University Press as How to Win an Election: An Ancient Guide for… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Education, Getty Villa

Percy Jackson, The Hunger Games, and Why Your Kids Need to Know Classical Culture

A family visiting the Getty Villa explores ancient art, history, and mythology through frescoes from the ancient Roman city of Herculaneum.
Mosaic with boxers: A scene from the Aenied in which two boxers fight to a bloody end for the watching crowd. (The J. Paul Getty Museum, 71.AH.106)

The adventure and derring-do of ancient myth is an easy sell to kids, and parents too for that matter. But I believe your kids need to know more. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Apocalypse Then: Bulwer-Lytton’s “The Last Days of Pompeii”

Cover and illustration from Bulwer-Lytton's The Last Days of Pompeii

Mount Vesuvius erupted on August 24, A.D. 79, burying Pompeii and neighboring towns under tons of ash and volcanic debris. Rediscovered by accident some 1,650 years later, the Vesuvian ruins captured the imagination of artists and writers, who vied to… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , 5 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Needlework Pattern Books

Pattern books from the GRI's collection in a display case, summer 2012

Copies of pattern, model, and sample books for needlework are among the rarest of early modern printed books to survive intact. The reason is simple: virtually all such books were considered “working copies,” and leaves were torn out to be… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Philanthropy, Publications

Online Scholarly Catalogues: Where Are We Now?

Cover of Moving Museum Catalogues Online, a Report from the Getty Foundation

How does the museum collections catalogue, traditionally made for print, fit into today’s world of apps, e-books, and iPhones? It turns out that going digital requires a profound rethinking of the ways in which art historical content can be interactively… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Publications

Illuminating the End of Time

Page from Illuminating the End of Time from Getty Publications

2012 was the year proclaimed as the end of time by Mayan hieroglyphs, extra-terrestrial communicators, and bad disaster movies. The Getty Apocalypse, a medieval manuscript of the biblical Book of Revelation recently published as a facsimile by Getty Publications, suggests… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Antiquities, Architecture and Design, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy, Publications

Unlocking the Secrets of an Ancient Fountain

“Mudmen” pose in front of Chambers I and II at Peirene, on or about July 6, 1909

Do you picture archaeological sites as dry, dusty piles of stones? Meet Peirene, an ancient Greek ruin so tantalizing that archaeologists have literally died for it. Dry and dusty this place is not. The story of the alluring ruin is… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

“The Photographer with the Soul of an Architect”: Lucien Hervé

Cover of Le Corbusier & Lucien Herve / Getty Publications

In 1949, self-taught photographer Lucien Hervé (1910–2007) traveled from Paris to Marseille to see Unité d’habitation, a housing complex by architect Le Corbusier. Awed by the groundbreaking modern design, Hervé took 650 photographs of it in a single day. When… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , 2 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr