Dutch art

Posted in Art, Paintings

Five Ways of Seeing Van Gogh’s Irises

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3. Alone

With a little luck and an early arrival to the museum, you just might be able to enjoy Irises alone. If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy that makes it one of my favorite ways to see it.

4. Multiple Times

Detail of IrisesDuring my observations I noticed people often came back to see the painting multiple times in one day. I wonder if it’s due to its emotional complexity. One visitor felt the painting is filled with melancholy and sadness, pointing out Van Gogh’s stay in an asylum and the lone, white flower in the midst of the vibrant, purple irises. On the opposite end of the spectrum, another viewer felt the painting is full of joy, pointing out how vibrant the colors were, and how they manage to rise out of the seemingly dry, brown dirt.

5. Internationally

Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. DH0A5398 One of the great things about art is how we all bring our own perspectives to it. How

Many ways to see a Van Gogh. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Anne Woollett

Anne Woollett
Curator Anne Woolett, photographed inside the installation Hearsay of the Soul

The deep appeal of the imagined landscape. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Laughing Out Loud! Rembrandt Self-Portrait Now on View at the Getty

Close-up of face in Rembrandt Laughing / Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Rembrandt Laughing (detail), about 1628, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn. Oil on copper, 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.60

A youthful, confident Rembrandt shakes things up in the paintings galleries. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Art of Suggestion

Poetry of Paper haiku station with visitors

Visitors to the Getty Museum’s exhibition The Poetry of Paper reflect on negative space in the drawings on view by writing haiku. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Dear “Woman in Blue,” Let Me Tell You Of…

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“You will be forgotten. Your image, however, will be immortal. Through it, you will travel far—not by horse and cart, or merchant ship, but through the sky…” More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Paintings, Voices

Getty Voices: The Power of Vermeer

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Vermeer’s newly arrived Woman in Blue Reading a Letter seems calmly at home in our galleries—but introduces a distinctive new presence. More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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