Getty Artists Program

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

What You Wrote About Your Deepest Fears

COLLAGE_WHOSEVALUES

You shared, we listened. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Barbara Kruger and L.A. Teenagers Team Up to Ask, “Whose Values?”

Installation of Barbara Kruger's Whose Values in the Museum Entrance Hall

The contemporary artist worked with over 400 high schoolers to question, comment, and create. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: What #isamuseum?

Screen Shot 2013-06-10 at 8.22.53 AM

“The project emerged through extended dialogue with members of the Getty Museum’s Education Department, and it was certainly a collaboration.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Center, Photographs, Film, and Video

Camera-Ready: Hooper Elementary Students on a Digital Scavenger Hunt

Students from Hooper Avenue Elementary School participate in a scavenger hunt at the Getty Center organized by John Divola

The Getty Center is one of the most-photographed landmarks in Los Angeles, with visitors snapping images of its art, architecture, gardens, and breathtaking views. In March, the Getty Museum’s education department chose to up the ante with a “Digital Scavenger… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Art Is Life. So to Learn It, You Engage with Life”: Mark Bradford on Teaching

A student and her self-portrait sculpture in coated wire
A student and her self-portrait sculpture in coated wire

Artist Mark Bradford recently visited one of Kristine Hatanaka’s art classes at Culver City High School to talk to students about works they’d created based on his art-making activity RE-RE-Process, available through Open Studio. Initiated by Mark as part of… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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