Hearsay of the Soul

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Glenn Phillips

Glenn Phillips in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Glenn Phillips, photographed inside Werner Herzog’s installation Hearsay of the Soul

“You’re only rewarded by any encounter with an artwork if you get something out of it.” How to approach Werner Herzog. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Nancy Perloff

Nancy Perloff in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Nancy Perloff, photographed inside Werner Herzog's installation Hearsay of the Soul

“The end is a kind of apotheosis. Maybe that sounds too romantic or spiritual. But the single most remarkable thing is that you lose all sense of time.” More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Anne Woollett

Anne Woollett
Curator Anne Woolett, photographed inside the installation Hearsay of the Soul

The deep appeal of the imagined landscape. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Paul Young

Paul Young
Paul Young photographed within Hearsay of the Soul at the Getty Center. "It feels very personal, and that’s what makes it interesting," he says.

“I think he sees Hearsay of the Soul as a poem, and doesn’t want to make a documentary—that was a very deliberate choice. It feels very personal, and that’s what makes it interesting.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Travertine Improv

Four hands transform the Getty Center into a massive musical instrument. More»

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      I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower—and a troop of tidy, happy villages please me better than the finest banditti in the world.”

      Marianne looked with amazement at Edward, with compassion at her sister. Elinor only laughed.

      —Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, published on October 30, 1811

      Wooded Landscape by Paulus Lieder and Landscape with a Bare Tree and a Ploughman by Leon Bonvin, The J. Paul Getty Museum; Fantastic Oak Tree in the Woods, Carl Wilhelm Kolbe the Elder, The Getty Research Institute

      10/30/14

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