Hearsay of the Soul

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Glenn Phillips

Glenn Phillips in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Glenn Phillips, photographed inside Werner Herzog’s installation Hearsay of the Soul

“You’re only rewarded by any encounter with an artwork if you get something out of it.” How to approach Werner Herzog. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Nancy Perloff

Nancy Perloff in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Nancy Perloff, photographed inside Werner Herzog's installation Hearsay of the Soul

“The end is a kind of apotheosis. Maybe that sounds too romantic or spiritual. But the single most remarkable thing is that you lose all sense of time.” More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Anne Woollett

Anne Woollett
Curator Anne Woolett, photographed inside the installation Hearsay of the Soul

The deep appeal of the imagined landscape. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Paul Young

Paul Young
Paul Young photographed within Hearsay of the Soul at the Getty Center. "It feels very personal, and that’s what makes it interesting," he says.

“I think he sees Hearsay of the Soul as a poem, and doesn’t want to make a documentary—that was a very deliberate choice. It feels very personal, and that’s what makes it interesting.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Travertine Improv

Four hands transform the Getty Center into a massive musical instrument. More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Shark Attack!

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This dynamic painting of a 1749 shark attack in Havana, Cuba, by John Singleton Copley was too good to paint only once. The original hangs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. A second full-sized version of the painting, which Copley created for himself, was inherited by his son and eventually gifted to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

      The third version (shown here) is slightly reduced in size, with a more vertical composition. It resides in the Detroit Institute of Arts.

      A quick peek into the digitized stock and sales books of art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute shows the sale of Copley’s masterpiece. It was entered under stock number A3531 in July 1946 and noted as being sold to the Gallery by Robert Lebel, a French writer and art expert. The Knoedler clerk also carefully records the dimensions of the painting—30 ¼ x 36 inches, unframed.

      On the right side of the sales page you’ll find the purchaser listed as none other than the Detroit Institute of Arts. The corresponding sales book page gives the address: Woodward Ave, Detroit, Mich., still the location of the museum.

      Watson and the Shark, 1782, John Singleton Copley. Detroit Institute of Arts

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      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      02/10/16

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