Hiroshi Sugimoto

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Re-Picturing Photographic History

Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto
Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Why is contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto taking pictures of 175-year-old prints? More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Diorama-rama: History Behind Glass

Polar Bear, 1976, Hiroshi Sugimoto (Japanese, born 1948), gelatin silver print, © Hiroshi Sugimoto, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council
© Hiroshi Sugimoto

Photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto plays with dioramas’ tension between real and fake, fact and spectacle. More»

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      Eye-to-eye with a devotional painting of Christ.

      This haunting and intimate portrait of Christ is both dramatic and spiritual. Less than a foot high, the panel was made for private use.

      See the full picture here.

       Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

      10/22/14

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