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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

The Getty Foundation’s 30th Anniversary

Shelf of exhibition catalogues from Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A., 1945-1980
Pacific Standard Time publications

A look back at the Getty Foundation’s 30 years of support for study and preservation of the visual arts. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

India’s Vibrant Cultural Heritage Comes to Life at Nagaur Fort

Nagaur, Sheesh Mahal: vault painting with ladies amid clouds and lightning bolts. © Courtauld Institute of Art
Nagaur, Sheesh Mahal: vault painting with ladies amid clouds and lightning bolts. © Courtauld Institute of Art

A 20-year project Initiated by the Getty Foundation at the Historic Fort Has Lasting Effects Located in northwest India, a two hour drive from the fortress city of Jodhpur in Rajasthan lies the Nagaur-Ahhichatragarh Fort. Begun in the 12th century… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Pointing East, Thinking West: Felice Beato’s Photographic View

Interior of the Sikh Temple with Marble Mosaic, Felice Beato (British, born Italy, 1832–1909), negative, 1858; print 1862. Printed by Henry Hering. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.475.7

Whether he planted his tripod in India, China, Japan, Korea, or Burma, the Italian-born photographer Felice Beato always portrayed a country’s culture through a distinctly Western lens. The Museum’s current exhibition of his work, Felice Beato: A Photographer on the… More»

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      JAMES WELLING

      Artists in Light, Paper, Process connect to the history of photography in a tangible way. All seven of the artists in the show work with repetition, seeking to uncover how a similar technique or gesture can lead to unexpected results.

      For his sinuous Water series, James Welling plunged sheets of photographic paper into a basin, achieving through this simple act a remarkable variety of shapes, tones, and colors. “It’s the same gesture again and again, with each result different,” explained our photographs curator. “It’s not about achieving the perfect image one time only, but about mastering the gesture and seeing its diverse realizations.”


      Water, 2009, James Welling, chromogenic print. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles. © James Welling

      07/30/15

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