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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

The Getty Foundation’s 30th Anniversary

Shelf of exhibition catalogues from Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A., 1945-1980
Pacific Standard Time publications

A look back at the Getty Foundation’s 30 years of support for study and preservation of the visual arts. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

India’s Vibrant Cultural Heritage Comes to Life at Nagaur Fort

Nagaur, Sheesh Mahal: vault painting with ladies amid clouds and lightning bolts. © Courtauld Institute of Art
Nagaur, Sheesh Mahal: vault painting with ladies amid clouds and lightning bolts. © Courtauld Institute of Art

A 20-year project Initiated by the Getty Foundation at the Historic Fort Has Lasting Effects Located in northwest India, a two hour drive from the fortress city of Jodhpur in Rajasthan lies the Nagaur-Ahhichatragarh Fort. Begun in the 12th century… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Pointing East, Thinking West: Felice Beato’s Photographic View

Interior of the Sikh Temple with Marble Mosaic, Felice Beato (British, born Italy, 1832–1909), negative, 1858; print 1862. Printed by Henry Hering. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.475.7

Whether he planted his tripod in India, China, Japan, Korea, or Burma, the Italian-born photographer Felice Beato always portrayed a country’s culture through a distinctly Western lens. The Museum’s current exhibition of his work, Felice Beato: A Photographer on the… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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