Jan Vermeer

Posted in Art, Paintings

Vermeer Taught Me to Love Again

The Milkmaid / Vermeer
The Milkmaid, ca, 1660, Johannes Vermeer. Oil on canvas, 45.5 x 41 cm. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Vermeer changes a life. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Dear “Woman in Blue,” Let Me Tell You Of…

vemeer_writing_steve_featured

“You will be forgotten. Your image, however, will be immortal. Through it, you will travel far—not by horse and cart, or merchant ship, but through the sky…” More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

What Makes an Artist Great? Curator Scott Schaefer on Vermeer

Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Johannes Vermeer as installed at the Getty Center
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

Johannes Vermeer is a beloved artist. Is he also a great one? More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Paintings, Voices

Getty Voices: The Power of Vermeer

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Vermeer’s newly arrived Woman in Blue Reading a Letter seems calmly at home in our galleries—but introduces a distinctive new presence. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Write the Opening Line to Vermeer’s “Lady in Blue”

Detail of woman's face and letter in Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Vermeer
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

What do you imagine the first line of this letter might say? Share your ideas, and we’ll continue the story. More»

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      New to our archives: Six 16th-century woodblocks illustrating buttercup, thistle, datura, dropwort, lettuce, and teasel. The woodblocks were first printed in the 1562 edition of Dioscorides, which became the standard reference work on medical botany. These join the Tania Norris Collection of Rare Botanical Books.

      Woodblock and print of “Teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris),” 1565, Giorgio Liberale and Wolfgang Meyer. The Getty Research Institute

      03/27/15

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