Last Days of Pompeii

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

“The Last Days of Pompeii” and the Archaeology of Imagination

The Forum at Pompeii with Vesuvius in the Distance / Christen Schjellerup Kobke

Having traveled to countless archaeological excavations—and heard, overheard, or given tours at archaeological sites from diverse cultures—I am often struck by what narratives about the ancient world grab people’s imagination. Whether it be hair-raising mythological stories brought to life by… More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Apocalypse Then: Bulwer-Lytton’s “The Last Days of Pompeii”

Cover and illustration from Bulwer-Lytton's The Last Days of Pompeii

Mount Vesuvius erupted on August 24, A.D. 79, burying Pompeii and neighboring towns under tons of ash and volcanic debris. Rediscovered by accident some 1,650 years later, the Vesuvian ruins captured the imagination of artists and writers, who vied to… More»

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      radomanci:

      thegetty:

      Ancient Bronzes Visit  Los Angeles

      Rare, powerful, beautiful, and unusual sculptures from the Ancient world demonstrate the innovations in technique, portraiture, and subject matter during the Hellenistic Period. 

      What is a Hellenistic Bronze? Here’s our explainer on the Getty Iris blog.


      Installation views with objects (in order top to bottom) courtesy of The National Archaeological Museum, Athens, the Republic of Croatia, Ministry of Culture and the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Antikensammlung, and Archaeological Museum of Kalymnos.

      is this the exhibition that just closed in Florence?

      Yes! It was at the Palazzo Strozzi, and will continue to the National Gallery of Art, DC in December.

      07/28/15

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