photographic processes

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Opposites Attract

Tarascon / Charles Tarascon
Tarascon, 1852, Charles Nègre. Waxed paper negative with selectively applied pigment, 9 5/16 x 13 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2015.43.9

For 19th-century photographers, the negative was the true work of art. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

A Brief History of Animals in Photography

In the Box/Out of the Box / William Wegman
© William Wegman

Animals as photographic subject. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

A Re-Imagined Getty, Drenched in Color

Video still
Video still

A video inspired by photographic history and 20th-century art. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Light, Paper, Process: Reinventing Photography

Spin (C-824) / Marco Breuer

Seven photographers revel in process, experiment, chance, and the happy mistake. More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Sculpted Photographs of the California Coast

Mussel Rocks, California / Laura Plageman
Courtesy of De Soto Gallery

You’ve never seen the California coast like this before. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Skeletons Carousing in Hell

Stereograph with skeletons and Satan / French, 1860s or 1870s

Skeletons in our closet. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Re-Picturing Photographic History

Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto
Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Why is contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto taking pictures of 175-year-old prints? More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Diorama-rama: History Behind Glass

Polar Bear, 1976, Hiroshi Sugimoto (Japanese, born 1948), gelatin silver print, © Hiroshi Sugimoto, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council
© Hiroshi Sugimoto

Photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto plays with dioramas’ tension between real and fake, fact and spectacle. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Friday DIY: Create Your Own Camera Obscura

gm_341591EX1

Make your own camera obscura two ways: in a box, or in a whole room. More»

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Posted in Art, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications, Research

Getty Conservation Institute Releases Critical New Resource for Conserving Historic Photographs

An early carbon photograph by Adolphe Brown, Two Girls (detail), date unknown. Private collection.
An early carbon photograph by Adolphe Brown, Two Girls (detail), date unknown. Private collection

This new digital publication offers science-based tools to identify how photographs were made. More»

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      Whose Values?, a collaborative project between Barbara Kruger and local high school students, asks some big questions. Here’s what our visitors have been saying.

      What do you hope for?

      08/02/15

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