photographic processes

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

A Brief History of Animals in Photography

In the Box/Out of the Box / William Wegman
© William Wegman

Animals as photographic subject. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

A Re-Imagined Getty, Drenched in Color

Video still
Video still

A video inspired by photographic history and 20th-century art. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Light, Paper, Process: Reinventing Photography

Spin (C-824) / Marco Breuer

Seven photographers revel in process, experiment, chance, and the happy mistake. More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Sculpted Photographs of the California Coast

Mussel Rocks, California / Laura Plageman
Courtesy of De Soto Gallery

You’ve never seen the California coast like this before. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Skeletons Carousing in Hell

Stereograph with skeletons and Satan / French, 1860s or 1870s

Skeletons in our closet. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Re-Picturing Photographic History

Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto
Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Why is contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto taking pictures of 175-year-old prints? More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Diorama-rama: History Behind Glass

Polar Bear, 1976, Hiroshi Sugimoto (Japanese, born 1948), gelatin silver print, © Hiroshi Sugimoto, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council
© Hiroshi Sugimoto

Photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto plays with dioramas’ tension between real and fake, fact and spectacle. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Friday DIY: Create Your Own Camera Obscura

gm_341591EX1

Make your own camera obscura two ways: in a box, or in a whole room. More»

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Posted in Art, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications, Research

Getty Conservation Institute Releases Critical New Resource for Conserving Historic Photographs

An early carbon photograph by Adolphe Brown, Two Girls (detail), date unknown. Private collection.
An early carbon photograph by Adolphe Brown, Two Girls (detail), date unknown. Private collection

This new digital publication offers science-based tools to identify how photographs were made. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research, Voices

Getty Voices: Be a Photograph Sleuth

Miriam looks through her handy magnifying glass and light to try to determine the photographic process of this image.
Miriam looks through her handy magnifying glass and light to try to determine the photographic process of this image.

I spend as much of my time looking through a magnifying glass as a classic detective does—solving the mysteries of the Getty’s Department of Photographs. More»

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      Presidential Death Beds & Independence Day

      Here’s a little history trivia about this special day

      John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, Founding Fathers and the second and third Presidents of the United States, both died on July 4, 1826, on the 50th anniversary of Independence Day. 

      Because of their opposing views on politics as well as their contrasting personalities, the two men were not on friendly terms, and rumor has it that Adams’ last words on his deathbed were “Jefferson survives.” Little did he know that Jefferson had actually died five hours earlier.

      Leaving you with that conversation starter, we hope you celebrate this day with friends and family and feast like the Romans!

      07/04/15

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