Rembrandt

Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Laughing Out Loud! Rembrandt Self-Portrait Now on View at the Getty

Close-up of face in Rembrandt Laughing / Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Rembrandt Laughing (detail), about 1628, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn. Oil on copper, 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.60

A youthful, confident Rembrandt shakes things up in the paintings galleries. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Getty Museum Contributes 3,325 Artworks to Google Art Project

The J. Paul Getty Museum on Google Art Project

Van Gogh’s Irises is now available for your personal art collection, along with Turner’s Modern Rome, Rembrandt’s The Abduction of Europa, and over 3,000 more artworks from the J. Paul Getty Museum. We’re excited to join 134 other museums, from… More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Tonight: Peter Greenaway on Cinema and Art History

Peter Greenaway. Phot: Dennis van Doorn

Filmmaker Peter Greenaway speaks at the Getty Center tonight as part of our Getty Perspectives lecture series, which invites distinctive artists and scholars to offer their perspectives on the visual arts. I’ve long wanted Peter Greenaway to be part of… More»

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      PRUSSIAN BLUE

      It started as a mistake, transformed workflow for architects, and revived Japanese print-making.

      Created as a result of mixing blood, potash, and iron sulfate while trying to make red cochineal dye, Prussian blue was announced officially in 1710. 

      Paper covered with ammonium ferric citrate plunged into potassium ferricyanide turned Prussian blue and preserved the image of objects set on top of the paper in the process. And thus the “cyanotype” was born.

      From there, architects found these “blue prints” useful to make copies of one drawing. Sound familiar?

      More in The Brilliant History of Color in Art

      The Italian Comedians, about 1720, Jean-Antoine Watteau. J. Paul Getty Museum.
      Equisetum sylvaticum, 1853, Anna Atkins; and Anne Dixon. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      01/28/15

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