Robert Rauschenberg

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Publications

New SFMOMA Catalogue Gives Museums 5 Reasons to Embrace Digital Publishing

SFMOMA's Rauschenberg Research Project

SFMOMA’s new online catalogue of Robert Rauschenberg’s work harnesses multimedia, archival material, and more. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Beatrice Monti della Corte and the Americans

Beatrice Monti della Corte (detail) / Alexander Liberman
Beatrice Monti della Corte (detail), 1962, Alexander Liberman. The Getty Research Institute, 2000.R.19

The glamorous owner of the Galleria dell’Ariete in Milan was key to the careers of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, among many others. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Research

Looking With New Eyes at Scholarly Art Catalogues

SFMOMA, one of the participants in the OSCI initiative, has chosen to focus on Robert Rauschenberg, given their significant holdings of his work, and their team is gathering together curatorial essays, conservation documentation, audio interviews and related materials in a single online resource. Image: Collection (formerly Untitled), Robert Rauschenberg, 1954, oil, paper, fabric, wood, and metal on canvas, SFMOMA
SFMOMA, one of the participants in the OSCI initiative, has chosen to focus on Robert Rauschenberg, given their significant holdings of his work, and their team is gathering together curatorial essays, conservation documentation, audio interviews and related materials in a single online resource. Image: Collection (formerly Untitled), Robert Rauschenberg, 1954, oil, paper, fabric, wood, and metal on canvas, SFMOMA

The scholarly catalogue has long been a critical part of a museum’s mission, providing authoritative information about collection objects for scholars, students, and the general public. Richly illustrated and often based on years of painstaking research, print catalogues form one… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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