science

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: The Microfading Tester

Vincent Beltran uses a microfading tester on a tapestry from the Getty Museum’s collection

Measuring color changes in light-sensitive works of art. More»

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Posted in Art

What Happens When Stem Cell Science and Performance Art Collide?

Ear on Arm, 2006, Stelarc. London, LOs Angeles, and Melbourne. Image by Nina Sellars, courtesy of Stelarc.
Ear on Arm, 2006, Stelarc. London, LOs Angeles, and Melbourne. Image by Nina Sellars, courtesy of Stelarc.

“Artsci”: How Avant-Garde Experimenters Are Deploying the Tools of Science More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)

Portrait of scientist Herant Khanajian in a Getty Conservation Institute lab with an FTIR machine
Herant Khanajian in a Getty Conservation Institute lab with an FTIR machine

This technique allows conservation scientists to identify materials from the tiniest of samples. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Education, Getty Conservation Institute

Boot Camp for Conservators Explores X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

XRF analysis of The Title Makers / Alfred Jensen
Artwork: Yale University Art Gallery

In a joint Yale-Getty program, conservators learn to harness physics to analyze art. More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Paintings, Research

The Value of Record Keeping: Frederick Hammersley’s Painting Books

Frederick Hammersley's paints and studio tools / Albuquerque, New Mexico
Frederick Hammersley's paints and studio tools as left on his painting table at his home studio in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The artist’s remarkably detailed records offer a huge boon to conservation science. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

What’s in a Wood? How Science Helps to Reveal the Eames’ Vision

The living room in the Eames House after conservation and reinstallation
The living room in the Eames House after conservation and reinstallation of the collection. The floor-to-ceiling wall of beautiful golden wood serves as the stunning backdrop for the room. Getty Conservation Institute

Conservators make an intriguing finding about the wood in the Eames House. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research, Voices

Behind the Scenes at the GCI | Getty Voices

GCI Lab \ Beril Bicer-Simsir
Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir testing grouts in the Getty Conservation Institute's laboratories.

A relatively new discipline, conservation science merges art and analysis to solve thorny conservation problems. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Research, Voices

Getty Voices: Attic Pots and Atomic Particles

Image_03

How did the ancient Greeks make their characteristic red-and-black pottery? Modern science may finally yield the answer. More»

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Posted in Art, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Paintings

What Do Rocks Have to Do with Renaissance Art?

jerome_azurite_featured

Why the manuscript illuminations in Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance really rock. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research

Mars Rover Technology Helps Unlock Art Mysteries

Giacomo Chiari, head of the science department at the Getty Conservation Institute, examines the painting on the west wall in the tomb of King Tutankhamen

This coming weekend, NASA’s latest Mars Rover, Curiosity, is scheduled to touch down on the Red Planet to begin two years of scientific discovery, helping scientists unlock some of the planet’s as yet undiscovered secrets. Interestingly, the same technology being… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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