technology

Posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research

100,000 Digitized Art History Materials from the Getty Research Institute Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

Barnsdall Park / Julius Shulman
Barnsdall Park, Shulman Retrospective (Los Angeles, California), 1969, photographed by Julius Shulman. Print: Frank Taylor. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10 (Job 4460)

There’s a new place to explore digital treasures from the vast collections of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Google Summer of Code Pairs Up with Arches Project

Google Summer of Code Intern Palash Oswal (left) at an week-long Arches community workshop held in the UK this summer.
Google Summer of Code Intern Palash Oswal (left) at an week-long Arches community workshop held in the UK this summer.

Two Google-sponsored interns combine their interests in cultural heritage and tech development to work on this open-source software system More»

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Posted in Art, Education

Will the Laptop Destroy the Coffee Shop?

Is the Internet killing public space? A Zocalo-Getty panel

Is the Internet making us weird? More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

3D Scanning Meets Ancient Art

image001_EDIT

Ancient art is the subject of a 3D scanning pilot at the Getty Museum. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Art & Architecture Thesaurus Now Available as Linked Open Data

Linked Open Data / Vincent van Gogh's Irises

A key reference database on art and architecture is now available for free download. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Beyond Digitization—New Possibilities in Digital Art History

Madonna, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Saint Paul / Bernardo Daddi
Digital Daddis. In the Getty Center galleries with Madonna, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Saint Paul, about 1330, Bernardo Daddi. Tempera and gold leaf on panel, 47 1/2 x 22 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 93.PB.16

Museums and libraries have digitized millions of works of art. Now what? More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Dean of Canterbury Cathedral Offers Tales of Art and Creativity

The Very Reverend Dr. Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury
The Very Reverend Dr. Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury

“Canterbury Cathedral tells the story of England across the centuries since the arrival of St. Augustine in 597—in glass and wood and stone, and in artifacts and music sung daily.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Voices

Getty Voices: The Social Museum

Where do you get new ideas?

How do we make ourselves more social, more innovative, less afraid of failure? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts, Voices

Getty Voices: Looking Closely

Using augmented reality on an iPad in The Life of Art at the Getty Museum

As the designer of The Life of Art, my job was to get you to look—really look. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit idiosyncratic. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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