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Posted in #GettyInspired, Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video

Photography Pro Tips from Alex Barber

#GettyInspired photographer Alex Barber’s pro-tips on cameras and great shots. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Publications, Scholarship

Digital Publishing Needs New Tools

MCN 2015 - Minneapolis

How can we humanize the experience of digital publishing? More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Conservation, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Getty Foundation Awards 14 New Grants for “Keeping It Modern”

The Solar Observatory Einstein Tower on the Telegrafenberg in Potsdam. Photo: R. Arlt / Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP)
The Solar Observatory Einstein Tower on the Telegrafenberg in Potsdam. Photo: R. Arlt / Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP)

New grants in the Foundation’s modern architecture initiative will help conserve important buildings around the globe. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Getty Foundation Launches Searchable Online Grant Database

Screencap of the Getty Foundation's new grant database. Courtesy of the Getty Foundation
Screencap of the Getty Foundation's new grant database. Courtesy of the Getty Foundation

Access to grant data across the Foundation’s entire 30-year history. More»

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Posted in Getty360

New Getty360 App Offers Getty Events and Exhibitions at a Glance

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New app puts the Getty event calendar in your pocket. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Getty Union List of Artist Names (ULAN) Released as Linked Open Data

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A third database is released for download and sharing. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Publications

Museum Catalogues from Eight Institutions You Can Now Read Online

The Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative, or OSCI, led by the Getty Foundation, is finding solutions for the complex task of creating museum publications in a free digital format.
The Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative, or OSCI, led by the Getty Foundation, is finding solutions for the complex task of creating museum publications in a free digital format.

Another online collections catalogue supported by the Getty Foundation has launched More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Museum Visitors Write the Rules of 21st-Century Chivalry

Be Aware of Others

Visitors common-sense (and sometimes hilarious) rules for 21st-century behavior. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Scholarship

Beyond Borders: The Humanities in the Digital Age

Terms for marble in multiple languages, superimposed on a carved marble sculpture of Athena
Selected multilingual terms from the entry for marble in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus

The Web has revolutionized the way we study art and culture. More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Preventing Digital Decay

Digitally decayed scan of a book from the Getty Research Institute / Bernard Picart
Crop of a digitally decayed scan of a page from Ceremonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde, representeées par des figures dessinées de la main de Bernard Picard, avec une explication historique, & quelques dissertations curieuses, 1723–1743. The Getty Research Institute, 1387-555

Digital files are fragile. What to do? More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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