About: Susan Lansing Maish, Eduardo P. Sánchez, and Erin Branham

Susan Lansing Maish I’m assistant conservator in the Department of Antiquities Conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum, where I have worked for 25 years. I am very excited to be working on such a rare and beautiful collection of silver artifacts, the Berthouville Treasure, and am very interested in the stories each object has to tell us. It is little like being a detective, unraveling the manufacturing and restoration histories of these objects. Eduardo P. Sánchez I’m associate conservator in the Department of Antiquities Conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum. During my 25 years with the Museum, I’ve worked on numerous exhibitions and in-depth collaborative projects of both domestic and international scale, such as the conservation of an important imperial Roman portrait sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius owned by the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany, and the first major exhibition in the U.S. devoted to ancient mosaic masterpieces from Tunisia, Stories in Stone: Conserving Mosaics of Roman Africa. Currently I am working on a collaborative conservation project with the Cabinet des Médailles in the Bibliothèque nationale de France to complete the conservation of Roman silver luxury items that are part of the Berthouville Treasure. I am overseeing the documentation, assessment, and conservation of these extraordinary pieces, which will be displayed at the Getty Villa before the collection is returns to France. Erin Branham I'm the education specialist for family programs at the Getty Villa. In addition to the Villa Teen Apprentice program, I oversee tours, workshops, and drop-in programs designed for parents and children to enjoy together as they learn about art of the ancient world. I've been in museum education for over 20 years and hold a master's degree in art education from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Posts by Susan Lansing Maish, Eduardo P. Sánchez,

Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Conserving the Berthouville Treasure

Early 20th-century print of silver vessel number 11 from the Berthouville Treasure
Early 20th-century print of silver vessel number 11 from the Berthouville Treasure. Plate XV in Ernest Babelon, Le trésor d'argenterie de Berthouville près Bernay (Eure) (Paris, 1916). The Getty Research Institute, 2908-151

Conservation treatment represents an important moment in the life of an object, and this is particularly true for the Berthouville Treasure, an extraordinary group of Gallo-Roman silver that arrived at the Getty Villa two years ago. In collaboration with the… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: June 30

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This portrait of actress Antonia Zárate by Goya is now part of the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland. The records of famed art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute reveal its recent provenance: the painting was sold by Knoedler on June 30, 1910, to financier Otto Beit. Part of his collection, including this painting, was later donated to the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin. To this day the Gallery showcases some of its greatest masterpieces in the Beit Wing. This spread from a digitized Knoedler stock book records the transaction (second entry from top).

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art. He sold European paintings to collectors (such as Henry Clay Frick, the Vanderbilts, and Andrew Mellon) whose collections formed the genesis of great museums such as the National Gallery of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Frick Collection, the Huntington, and more. Knoedler’s stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Portrait of Doña Antonia Zárate, ca. 1805–06, José de Goya y Lucientes. Beit Collection, National Gallery of Ireland. Image courtesy of the National Gallery of Ireland.

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      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      06/30/15

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