Ask a Curator Day

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Art Experts Take to Twitter for Ask a Curator Day on Wednesday, September 17

Karen1
Poised for any question: Karen Hellman of the Getty Museum's Department of Photographs

Five Getty curators are on tap for a live Twitter Q&A this Wednesday. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Talk to the World’s Art Experts Online during Ask-a-Curator Day, September 18

Bryan Keene / #AskaCurator
Manuscripts curator Bryan Keene awaits your #AskaCurator questions

Curators take Twitter on Wednesday to answer your questions big and small. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum

We Answer Your Questions for Ask-a-Curator Day

Julian Brooks of the Getty Museum's Department of Drawings with an #askthecurator sign

Today is international Ask a Curator Day, when hundreds of museums around the world are calling for questions for curators on pretty much any subject under the sun. We’ve been collecting your questions here on The Iris, as well as… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum

Ask Us! International Ask-a-Curator Day is Wednesday, September 19

Gravestone with a Woman and Her Attendant / Greek

Update—Questions and answers here! We’re excited to join hundreds of art, history, and science museums internationally to participate in Ask-a-Curator Day, an online Q&A in which our friendly art experts—curators and conservators at the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute—will… More»

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      Olympian Census #3: Poseidon

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Neptune

      Employment: God of the Sea

      Place of residence: A fancy palace somewhere in the Aegean Sea

      Parents: Cronus and Rhea

      Marital status: Married to Amphitrite, a sea goddess, but had many affairs just like his brother Zeus

      Offspring: Had many children including Triton, Theseus, Orion, Polyphemos and Arion

      Symbol: Trident, horse, and dolphin

      Special talent: Starting earthquakes & Shapeshifting into a horse to pursue women

      Highlights reel:

      • When Goddess Demeter turned into a mare to escape Poseidon’s pursuit, Poseidon also turned into a horse and mated with her, creating a talking horse baby, Arion.
      • Athena became the patron goddess of Athens over Poseidon by giving the city an olive tree, which produced wood, oil, and food. Poseidon had given them a salt-water spring. Nice going, Poseidon.
      • Poseidon cursed Olysseus to wander the seas for 10 years after the Trojan War in revenge for Olysseus blinding his son, the cyclops Poplyphemos.

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      07/27/15

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