De Wain Valentine

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Pacific Standard Time Takes Berlin

PSTinBerlin: The Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, with the Kunst in Los Angeles banner flying high

Pacific Standard Time officially ended in Los Angeles on March 31, but it continues nearly 6,000 miles away in Berlin. Pacific Standard Time: Kunst in Los Angeles 1950–1980 opened at the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin on March 15th. With double the… More»

Also tagged , , , 1 Response
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute

See Valentine on Valentine’s!

De Wain Valentine at the Getty Center with Gray Column, 2012

Artist De Wain Valentine created his own kind of love letter to the California sea and sky: Gray Column, a 3,500-pound sculpture made of polyester resin that’s twelve feet high and eight feet across. This February 14, come visit From… More»

Also tagged , , 7 Responses
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations

Pacific Standard Time Is for Kids!

Exploring De Wain Valentine’s Gray Column. Photo: Damon Cason Reiser. From J. Is a Bird
Exploring reflections in De Wain Valentine’s Gray Column. Photo: Damon Cason Reiser. From J. Is a Bird

If you’re a parent, you might be wondering whether Pacific Standard Time is safe for tender eyes. It’s true that several PSTinLA shows tear into grown-up themes, from feminist protest to LGBTQ aesethetics, but there are also plenty of ways… More»

Also tagged , , , 4 Responses
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute

Talking with Artist De Wain Valentine

De Wain Valentine polishing one of his eight-foot-diameter polyester Circles in his Venice studio in the late 1960s

One of the most influential sculptors active in Los Angeles in the 1960s and ’70s, De Wain Valentine is perhaps best known for his large-scale polyester resin sculptures of simple geometric forms that interact intensely with the surrounding light. Not… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Walk through “Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents,” Opening This Weekend

Inside Crosscurrents: Helen Lundeberg's canvas Blue Planet with John Mason's sculptures Vertical Sculpture, Spear Form and Orange Cross

In the ocean, a crosscurrent runs across the main flow, stirring things up. Similarly, you can see different artistic movements, crossing each other from a variety of directions, in the exhibition Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture,… More»

Also tagged , 1 Response
Posted in Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Gray Column Rises

Gray Column / De Wain Valentine

One of the most influential sculptors active in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, De Wain Valentine is perhaps best known for his striking, semitransparent, and delicately colored large-scale polyester resin sculptures of simple geometric forms that interact intensely… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 5 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

  • Flickr