Edgar Degas

Posted in Art, Prints and Drawings, Publications

The Human Predicament, in Pastel

Waiting / Degas
Owned jointly with the Norton Simon Art Foundation, Pasadena

An enigmatic pastel shows Degas’s talent for drawing human psychology. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Why Is This Drawing in a Museum?

Abstract Lines / Degas
The mysterious drawing in question. Abstract Lines, about 1877, Edgar Degas. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A look inside a sketchbook by Degas reveals the story behind a unusual drawing. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Dancing with Degas: New Curriculum Brings Art and Movement into the Classroom

Dancing with Degas - Curriculum premiere at the Getty Center
Dancing with Degas - Curriculum premiere at the Getty Center

As a fourth-grade teacher, I take every opportunity to integrate art into the classroom. So when I was asked to be on the Teacher Advisory Group for the new Performing Arts in Art curriculum for K–12 teachers, I was thrilled…. More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Honey, They’re Playing Our Painting

Dancer Taking a Bow (The Prima Ballerina), Edgar Degas, pastel and gouache on paper, 33 1/2 x 27 in. (85.1 x 68.6 cm). Private collection

Many couples have a favorite song, a tune that conjures up memories of blissful infatuation and unending devotion. Elia and Maranatha have a painting. The couple met three years ago when Elia, a musician, was playing at a club in… More»

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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