exhibitions

Posted in People & Places

Top Tips for Visiting #CaveTemples at the Getty

Inside the replica of Cave 275 from the cave temples of Dunhuang at the Getty
Inside the replica of Cave 275, featuring an impressive sculpture of Maitreya, Buddha of the future, flanked by two lions.

A quick guide to visiting the exhibition. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art & Archives, Getty Villa, technology

A Brief Introduction to Roman Mosaics

Mosaic face from Mosaic Floor with a Bear Hunt / Roman
Detail of a corner panel from Mosaic Floor with a Bear Hunt, A.D. 300–400, Roman, from near Baiae, Italy. Stone tesserae, 51–68 1/2 × 34 1/2–58 ¼ in.

15 key facts about this colorful and long-lasting art form More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Prints and Drawings

“Black is the most essential color”: Odilon Redon’s Noirs

Apparition (detail) / Odilon Redon
Detail of Apparition showing the combination of charcoal and pastel

A fascination with darkness, insomnia, and dreams More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, technology

Photography and Memory in the Wake of a Tsunami

Portrait of Cultivation from Rasen Kaigan (Spiral Shore) / Shiga Lieko
Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Shiga Lieko

“In the space of photographs, there is no past, present or future.” More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Behind the Scenes of a Special Exhibition at the Getty

Maxime LaLanne / Castle Overlooking a River
Gift of Richard A. Simms.

How a drawings show takes shape. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum

Getty Museum Honored for Exhibitions and Acquisitions

Installation view of "Power and Pathos: Bronze Sculpture," at the Getty Museum in 2015.

Getty Museum staff take home honors for exhibitions and programs in 2015. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum

Cleaning 700 Square Feet of Precious Tapestry

Weavers conserve a tapestry at the Gobelins Manufactory
Photo courtesy of the Gobelins Manufactory

Tapestries once owned by Louis XIV receive a high-tech cleaning. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

A Double-Sided Drawing Brings a Baron to Life

Detail of face of Portrait of Charles Benjamin de Langes de Montmirail, Baron de Lubieres / Liotard
Pastel on the verso (back) of the drawing is visible in the baron's skin tones

The hidden artistry of an 18th-century pastel. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Framing a Frames Exhibition

7

How to hang a frame. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Journey to Marquette

Marquette 2

A curator’s visit to see the French town that one of our precious manuscripts was made in. More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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