food

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty360, J. Paul Getty Museum

How to Eat Like a Renaissance Courtier

Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas
This istoriato plate bears the coat of arms of the Brescian Calini family and presents the myth of a musical contest between Apollo and the satyr Marsyas. Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas, mid-1520s, Nicola da Urbino. Tin-glazed earthenware, 2 1/4 x 16 5/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.DE.117

What did the Renaissance Italians really eat? More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Chocolate, The Food of the Gods

chocolate-avocado cake with ganache

Eating chocolate, from Moctezuma to Marie-Antoinette. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books

600 Historic Recipes for Potions, Paints, and Pastes

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 2.27.34 PM

Vintage recipes for pretty much anything, for free! More»

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Posted in Getty Center

Join the Getty Community in Donating Food for #GivingTuesday

Debra Canter and Joe Dyer with donations to the Westside Food Bank
Getty volunteers Debra Canter and Joe Dyer with a vanload of donated food and toys at the Getty Center loading dock

Bring a donation of food on December 2 and we’ll match it. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Education

The Fine Art of Feasting in Roman Gaul

Pompeiian wall painting depicting autumn produce / Roman, A.D. 70
Wall painting from Pompeii (around A.D. 70) depicting autumn produce, grapes, apples, and pomegranates overflowing a large glass bowl, next to a tilting amphora and a terracotta pot of preserved fruit

A taste of mealtime in ancient France. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Taste of Byzantium

puddingblog

Coming July 19: A four-course dinner inspired by the cuisine of the Byzantine Empire. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Hot Sauce, Be My Fiery Muse

Hot sauce / Michael Hsiung
Hot sauce + pen-and-ink = Michael Hsiung's ode to L.A. cuisine, the poster image for LA Heat: Taste Changing Condiments at the Chinese American Museum

How do you make art about Tapatío and Sriracha? First, eat many tacos… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Great Literature Inspires Culinary Creations for “Selected Shorts”

Pea tendrils with scallop / Getty Restaurant
Spring on a plate: Pea tendrils over scallop pays humorous homage to Lydia Davis's story "Letter to a Frozen Peas Manufacturer"

Two of life’s pleasures come together this weekend: stories and food. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Voices

My L.A.: Learning to Love Baskin-Robbins

Burbank Baskin-Robbins ice cream store
Great architecture? Perhaps not. Community hub? Definitely.

What makes a building into a community gathering spot? Sometimes a nondescript exterior gives way to sugary goodness inside. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations

Korean Cooking, the Authentic Fusion Way

Korean cooking at the Getty

Getty chef Mayet Cristobal worked with volunteers from the Korean Cultural Center to create an authentic-fusion menu. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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