Italy

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

The Rise and Fall of a Court Artist in Renaissance Italy

Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso
Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso

The unusual life tale of Renaissance illuminator Belbello da Pavia More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Parallel Exhibitions on Renaissance Courts

Initial L: The Nativity, Master B. F., about 1542–45. Archivio Storico Civico e Biblioteca Trivulziana, Milan
Corale A, fol. 33 (© Comune di Milano. All rights reserved.)
Initial L: The Nativity, Master B. F., about 1542–45. Archivio Storico Civico e Biblioteca Trivulziana, Milan Corale A, fol. 33 (© Comune di Milano. All rights reserved.)

Los Angeles and Milan host parallel exhibitions of illuminated manuscripts. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty360, J. Paul Getty Museum

How to Eat Like a Renaissance Courtier

Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas
This istoriato plate bears the coat of arms of the Brescian Calini family and presents the myth of a musical contest between Apollo and the satyr Marsyas. Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas, mid-1520s, Nicola da Urbino. Tin-glazed earthenware, 2 1/4 x 16 5/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.DE.117

What did the Renaissance Italians really eat? More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Sicily, The International Island

The Crucifixion and the Harrowing of Hell / Sicilian
The Crucifixion and the Harrowing of Hell in a New Testament, Sicilian, late 1100s. Tempera colors, gold leaf, and ink on parchment, 9 11/16 x 6 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig I 5, fol. 191v

Medieval Sicily was a hotbed of political turmoil and artistic innovation. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Connecting the Art Historical Dots

Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust
Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy.

A Getty Foundation initiative is expanding the frontiers of art history by bringing scholars together from around the globe. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Voices

Getty Voices: Sicilian Journeys

Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome at the Getty Villa
Artwork reproduced by permission of the Regione Siciliana, Assessorato dei Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana. Dipartimento dei Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana

A charioteer? A dancer? The Mozia Youth, aguably one of the world’s most breathtaking ancient sculptures, is both mysterious and beautiful. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Researching the Renaissance

Julian Brooks in Florence with reproductions of Andrea del Sarto's Renaissance drawings
Florence, del Sarto, and I.

“It’s amazing to be immersed in Andrea del Sarto’s home city, his drawings, paintings, frescoes, and his life, normally all so far away when I’m in L.A.” More»

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Posted in Art, Gardens and Architecture, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Getty Voices: Renaissance Gardens

bourdichon_featured

A journey through Renaissance gardens and their paradoxes: natural and artificial, sin and salvation, virtue and vice. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

New Exhibition Offers Look Inside Pompeii’s Interiors

Detail of a transverse section of the House of the Tragic Poet in Pompeii / Jules Frederic Bouchet and Raoul Rochette

The exhibition Inside Out: Pompeian Interiors Exposed, recently opened at the Italian Cultural Institute in Westwood, provides a historic glimpse inside the houses and villas of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Drawing mainly from the photo archive of the Getty Research Institute,… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Italian Showcase

Portrait of a Halberdier (Francesco Guardi?), Pontormo, 1528–30. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 89.PA.49

If our globe had a school playground, could you spot Italy? That’s right, the one voted “most popular.” Good-looking, sharp, charismatic. Plus, a rock star in art class. This year, the popular kid turns 150. Surprisingly, the nation that for… More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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