Japanese art

Posted in Art, Prints and Drawings

Why the Iconic “Great Wave” Swept the World

Under the Wave off Kanagawa / Hosukai
Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The world’s most iconic image of a tsunami isn’t actually a tsunami. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Inside the Photography of Ishiuchi Miyako

Ishiuchi photographs a detail of the jacket
Ishiuchi photographs a detail of the jacket

70 years later, the Hiroshima bombing gives rise to hopeful art. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Re-Picturing Photographic History

Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto
Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Why is contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto taking pictures of 175-year-old prints? More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Neon Hitmen

tokyo_featured

Tokyo Drifter, screening this weekend, “smacks you in the face with a bucket of WTF paint.” More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Van Gogh’s Irises / Haiku Verses from Readers / An Invitation

The Irises in its gilded frame / Vincent van Gogh
Irises, 1889, Vincent van Gogh. Oil on canvas, 29 1/4 x 37 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 90.PA.20

Over 60 haiku in honor of Vincent van Gogh. More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Sword Safety

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      Haircut gone wrong or prop sword mishap? It’s actually story of backstabbing and assassination. 

      Here’s the full story:

      Once a great Roman military general, Pompey, fled Italy for Egypt as Caesar began a civil war. 

      When he arrived at his Egyptian exile, what Pompey thought was a welcoming party turned out to be a group of assassins. (Surprise!)

      Set against a blood-red background, Pompey’s severed head rests at the feet of Caesar who makes a gesture of rebuke.

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      02/09/16

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