Louvre

Posted in Art

Struck by Lightning at the Louvre

Crowds throng the Mona Lisa at the Louvre Museum, Paris
Today's Louvre—glorious crowds and all. It was different in 1969. Photo: Gabriel Cabreira, CC BY-ND 2.0

Sometimes the best way to discover your life’s work is by simple good luck. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Man of La Belle Ferronière

Image 5_The London Illustrated_July 18 1931_1

A fake Leonardo? The scandalous court case of art dealer Joseph Duveen. More»

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Posted in Education

Peter Plagens Answers Your Questions [VIDEO]

Peter Plagens
Peter Plagens: Ask him anything

More videos: • Has Los Angeles’s ecology of evil improved? • Are Huffington Post bloggers “volunteer slaves”? • What do you think about the dismantling of the Barnes Foundation? On Monday we put out a call on Facebook and Twitter… More»

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Posted in Art, Paintings

In Need of a Géricault “Fix”

Portrait Study for The Raft of the Medusa, Théodore Géricault, 1818–19

Even though it’s been more than a decade, I remember it as though it were yesterday. Like so many art history students, I made my first pilgrimage to the Louvre—tantamount to mecca for an art nerd like me—to feast my… More»

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      The Perfect Male Form?

      This bronze sculpture is a copy of an ancient Roman marble statue known as the Belvedere Antinous, long considered one of the most beautiful statues to survive from antiquity. Engravings of the statue were used as models in the study of perfect body proportions.

      The bronze was once owned by Louis XIV, who purchased bronze replicas of ancient sculptures to enhance his kingly magnificence.

      A Bronze God for the Sun King

      Belvedere Antinous, about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Plate 11 in Gérard Audran, Proportions of the human body, measured from the most beautiful sculptures of antiquity, 1683. The Getty Research Institute

      07/05/15

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