Manuscripts and Books

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Decoding the Medieval Volvelle

Volvelle Animation

It’s part timepiece, part floppy disk, and part crystal ball. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Expanding Access: Devotion and Objects

blogDH0A1977

A medieval Qur’an and a study day for American Muslim scholars. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

To Hell and Back: Dante’s Inferno in Art and Film

Filipo Argenti receiving his eternal torments in the River Styx (courtesy ©2007, Dante Film, LLC)

UPDATE: The screening of the 1911 film L’Inferno, scheduled for Saturday, June 23, at 3:00 p.m., has been cancelled. We apologize for the inconvenience. The other two films will screen as planned. The Museum’s Department of Manuscripts recently opened the… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Just Desserts – Gourmet Gothic Sweets

Dessert is served! Participants get ready to savor their Gothic treats

When you hear the word “Gothic,” what comes to mind? Black-lipstick-wearing teens? Cathedrals with flying buttresses? What about lavender pudding or torta bonissima? Students at the Getty learned what tickled the Gothic sweet tooth at a culinary course that featured… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Foundation

Inside Brunelleschi’s Dome

View of Brunelleschi's dome from the first gallery. Photo courtesy of the project for the photographic documentation of the Cupola of St. Maria del Fiore in Florence
View of Brunelleschi's dome from the first gallery. Photo courtesy of the project for the photographic documentation of the Cupola of St. Maria del Fiore in Florence

Italy is full of extraordinary, breathtaking round-the-corner experiences. You round a corner in Rome and find the Pantheon. In Pisa it could be the Torre Pendente di Pisa, better known as the Leaning Tower. When you arrive at the Florence… More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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