MEPPI

Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: The Handheld Loupe

Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Tram Vo examines a color photographs with a handheld loupe
Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Tram Vo examines color photographs with a handheld loupe to identify the process used to create them.

A handheld magnifying loupe helps conservators study historic photographs with the naked eye More»

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Posted in Conservation, Education, Getty Conservation Institute, Voices

Getty Voices: Preserving the Photographs of the Middle East

Cairo
© Fouad Debbas Collection

Training a new generation of museum professionals to preserve the rich photographs collections of the Middle East. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Education, Getty Conservation Institute, Philanthropy

Preserving the Photographic Heritage of the Middle East

Self-portrait by photographer Camille el Kareh, taken in Lebanon in the 1920s

We treasure our family photos because they are reminders of meaningful memories. The same can be said of the photographic collections held by institutions, for they represent who we are and where we have been. When photographs become damaged or… More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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