Music

Posted in Architecture and Design, Art

Which Artist Would You Recommend to a Space Alien?

Malin House ("Chemosphere") / John Lautner
Malin House ("Chemosphere"), 1960, designed by John Lautner. Photo by Julius Shulman, 1961. Julius Shulman Photography Archive. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10

A beginner’s guide to the human mind and heart. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Nancy Perloff

Nancy Perloff in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Nancy Perloff, photographed inside Werner Herzog's installation Hearsay of the Soul

“The end is a kind of apotheosis. Maybe that sounds too romantic or spiritual. But the single most remarkable thing is that you lose all sense of time.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Travertine Improv

Four hands transform the Getty Center into a massive musical instrument. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

The Adventures of Cricket and Flatfoot (aka The Okee Dokee Brothers)

ODB_Canoe_pic1

How’s this for a job: float down a river, then sing about it. The Okee Dokee Brothers reveal how they make it work. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

My First Concert Ever: Saturdays Off the 405 with Pickwick

Rosie Narasaki at Saturdays Off the 405 at the Getty Center
NOT photoshopped. Courtesy of ace-photographer (and Getty public programs coordinator) Jaclyn Kalkhurst

Really? Yes. 20-something intern Rosie Narasaki attends her first concert ever. And likes it. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith’s Archives and Collections Now at the Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith at Allen Ginsberg's Kitchen Table, New York City, 16 June 1988 / Allen Ginsberg
© Allen Ginsberg LLC

Best known for his experimental films and his anthology of American folk music, Harry Smith was a fascinating multidisciplinary artist and avid collector. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

How Do You Sing The Renaissance? Lionheart Does a Roaring Good Job

Pentecost in the Laudario of Sant'Agnese / Master of the Dominican Effigies

We’re welcoming Lionheart, one of America’s leading ensembles in vocal chamber music, for a concert this Saturday. Their performance of music from the early Renaissance complements the exhibition Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350. The… More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa

What Did Ancient Music Sound Like?

Sarcophagus with Scenes of Bacchus / Roman

Ancient works of art illustrate that music had a strong presence in daily life of classical Greece and Rome. Vase paintings and sculptures in the antiquities collection offer an eye-opening view of the variety of musical instruments that were played, as… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes

In Rehearsal with Inara George and Van Dyke Parks

inara_george

Saturday Nights at the Getty enjoys performing from aerial silk. It’s mostly a concert series, but it often features film, dance, poetry, or some improbably awesome musical mashup, like Irish mariachi or hip-hop violin. Earlier this season Inara George and… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Saturdays Off the 405: You Came, You Saw, You Tweeted

saturdays

Saturdays Off the 405 wrapped up its 2011 season last Saturday, October 15, but it lives on thanks to you who tweeted, Flickr’d and YouTubed it. Here, highlights! [View the story "Saturdays Off the 405 | 2011 Highlights" on Storify]

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      From you have I been absent in the spring,
      When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
      Hath put a spirit of youth in everything,
      That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him,
      Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
      Of different flowers in odor and in hue,
      Could make me any summer’s story tell,
      Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew.
      Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
      Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
      They were but sweet, but figures of delight,
      Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
      Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
      As with your shadow I with these did play.

      —William Shakespeare, born April 23, 1564

      Vase of Flowers (detail), 1722, Jan van Huysum. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      04/23/14

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