Music

Posted in Art, Paintings

A Pop Soundtrack to the Getty Collection, Vol. 1

Why Hasn't He Called
Young Italian Woman at a Table, about 1895–1900, Paul Cézanne. Oil on canvas. 36 1/4 x 28 15/16 inches. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Music shows off the collection in a new light. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Back to the Future with Chicano Batman

Chicano-Batman-1

They’re not just a Latin band. Five questions for Chicano Batman. More»

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Posted in Getty Center

Your Music Guide to Saturdays Off the 405

KiTblog

Liner notes for this season’s outdoor music. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Musicians and Artists Take Over the Getty for This Summer’s Friday Flights

Friday Flights at the Getty Center - summer 2014

Music nights that make you think: Friday Flights launches May 30. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art

Which Artist Would You Recommend to a Space Alien?

Malin House ("Chemosphere") / John Lautner
Malin House ("Chemosphere"), 1960, designed by John Lautner. Photo by Julius Shulman, 1961. Julius Shulman Photography Archive. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10

A beginner’s guide to the human mind and heart. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Four Minds on Herzog: A Conversation with Nancy Perloff

Nancy Perloff in Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul
Curator Nancy Perloff, photographed inside Werner Herzog's installation Hearsay of the Soul

“The end is a kind of apotheosis. Maybe that sounds too romantic or spiritual. But the single most remarkable thing is that you lose all sense of time.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Travertine Improv

Four hands transform the Getty Center into a massive musical instrument. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

The Adventures of Cricket and Flatfoot (aka The Okee Dokee Brothers)

ODB_Canoe_pic1

How’s this for a job: float down a river, then sing about it. The Okee Dokee Brothers reveal how they make it work. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

My First Concert Ever: Saturdays Off the 405 with Pickwick

Rosie Narasaki at Saturdays Off the 405 at the Getty Center
NOT photoshopped. Courtesy of ace-photographer (and Getty public programs coordinator) Jaclyn Kalkhurst

Really? Yes. 20-something intern Rosie Narasaki attends her first concert ever. And likes it. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith’s Archives and Collections Now at the Getty Research Institute

Harry Smith at Allen Ginsberg's Kitchen Table, New York City, 16 June 1988 / Allen Ginsberg
© Allen Ginsberg LLC

Best known for his experimental films and his anthology of American folk music, Harry Smith was a fascinating multidisciplinary artist and avid collector. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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