Peter Paul Rubens

Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Paintings

Best Supporting Role

Peter Paul Rubens's Triumph of the Church during treatment
© José de la Fuente

Conserving Peter Paul Rubens, panel by panel. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Paintings

10 Reasons Peter Paul Rubens Is the Ultimate Renaissance Man

Self-Portrait / Peter Paul Rubens
Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014

Multitasker, social media genius, collector, diplomat. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Peter Paul Rubens Unrolls in L.A.

It's almost up!
Tapestry © PATRIMONIO NACIONAL

See how Peter Paul Rubens’s enormous tapestries were installed at the Getty. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Marvels of Peter Paul Rubens’s “The Triumph of the Eucharist” Online

Rubens's Triumph of the Eucharist at the Prado
Photo © Museo Del Prado

Paintings and tapestries by the great baroque artist come to the Getty in October. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations

Korean Cooking, the Authentic Fusion Way

Korean cooking at the Getty

Getty chef Mayet Cristobal worked with volunteers from the Korean Cultural Center to create an authentic-fusion menu. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Getty Voices: Looking East, Looking West

Stephanie and I (seated, far right) with colleagues at the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, in November 2011. Back row, standing: left to right: Lee Jae-jeong, Moon Dong Soo, Min Kil-hong. Front row, seated, left to right: Lee Won Bok, Burglind Jungmann, Stephanie Schrader, Jessie Park
Stephanie and I (seated, far right) with colleagues at the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, in November 2011. Back row, standing: left to right: Lee Jae-jeong, Moon Dong Soo, Min Kil-hong. Front row, seated, left to right: Lee Won Bok, Burglind Jungmann, Stephanie Schrader, Jessie Park

“Looking East” established a platform for international dialogue around art, history, and cultural exchange. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

A Gallery Fit for a Prince and Now the Public? The Düsseldorf Gallery and the Modern Museum

View of a Room at Pommersfelden Palace. Johann Georg Pintz, printmaker; Salomon Kleiner, draftsman; in Representation au naturel des chateaux... (Augsburg, 1728), pl. 18. The Getty Research Institute,84-B21917

Most museum galleries have certain things in common. For one, the works are spaced a restful distance apart from one another on the wall. For another, they’re typically organized by school or theme. The focus might be, say, on fashion… More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

The Language of Drapery

Joseph and Potiphar's Wife (detail), Guido Reni, about 1630

Drapery—artfully folded fabric—has been used by European artists for centuries, from ancient Greek sculpture to contemporary photography. As I prepare for the studio course I’m leading this Wednesday on sketching drapery after the Old Masters, I’ve been thinking about why…. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

The Rise and Fall of Charles Le Brun: Q&A with Louis Marchesano

louis_marchesano_2

I talked to Louis Marchesano, curator of prints and drawings at the Getty Research Institute, about the exhibition Printing the Grand Manner: Charles Le Brun and Monumental Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, now on view at the GRI—how… More»

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      Color for Healing

      This sanitorium (tuberculosis hospital) in Paimio, Finland, was designed by architect Alvar Aalto in the 1920s. Unlike many hospitals, it was full of bright colors—including welcoming yellow on the main stairs and calming green for ceilings above bedridden patients. Aalto even created special chairs to open the chest and speed healing.

      The building’s colors were mostly whitewashed later in the 20th century, but now—due to a grant from the Getty Foundation as part of its Keeping It Modern initiative—its colors are being reconstructed and the building preserved for the future.

      More of the story: Saving Alvar Aalto’s Paimio Sanitorium

      Pictured: Paimio Sanatorium, patients’ wing and solarium terraces. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum. A color model for Paimio Sanatorium interiors by decorative artist Eino Kauria. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum, 2016.Paimio chairs (Artek no 41) in the Paimio Sanatorium lecture room, 1930s. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum. Aino Aalto resting in a chair on the solarium terrace. Photo: Alvar Aalto, Alvar Aalto Museum, 1930s. Main stairs of Paimio Sanatorium. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum.

      04/30/16

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