photographic processes

Posted in Art & Archives, Getty Center, Photographs, Film, and Video

Is Photography a Method of Social Control?

Murder of Madame Veuve Bol, Projection on a Vertical Plan, 1904, Album of Paris Crime Scenes, Alphonse Bertillon. Courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Murder of Madame Veuve Bol, Projection on a Vertical Plan from Album of Paris Crime Scenes, 1904, Alphonse Bertillon. Gelatin silver print, 9 1/16 x 11 7/16 in. Courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gilman Collection, Purchase, The Howard Gilman Foundation Gift, 2001 (2001.483.1–.172)

A new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art explores photography from mug shots to crime scene photos, More»

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Posted in #GettyInspired, Art & Archives, Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video

Photography Pro Tips from Alex Barber

#GettyInspired photographer Alex Barber’s pro-tips on cameras and great shots. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Editor's Picks, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Inside the Photography of Ishiuchi Miyako

Ishiuchi photographs a detail of the jacket
Ishiuchi photographs a detail of the jacket

70 years later, the Hiroshima bombing gives rise to hopeful art. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, technology

Opposites Attract

Tarascon / Charles Tarascon
Tarascon, 1852, Charles Nègre. Waxed paper negative with selectively applied pigment, 9 5/16 x 13 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2015.43.9

For 19th-century photographers, the negative was the true work of art. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Editor's Picks, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

A Brief History of Animals in Photography

In the Box/Out of the Box / William Wegman
© William Wegman

Animals as photographic subject. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

A Re-Imagined Getty, Drenched in Color

Video still
Video still

A video inspired by photographic history and 20th-century art. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Light, Paper, Process: Reinventing Photography

Spin (C-824) / Marco Breuer

Seven photographers revel in process, experiment, chance, and the happy mistake. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Photographs, Film, and Video

Sculpted Photographs of the California Coast

Mussel Rocks, California / Laura Plageman
Courtesy of De Soto Gallery

You’ve never seen the California coast like this before. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, technology

Skeletons Carousing in Hell

Stereograph with skeletons and Satan / French, 1860s or 1870s

Skeletons in our closet. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, technology

Re-Picturing Photographic History

Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto
Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Why is contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto taking pictures of 175-year-old prints? More»

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      Clocking in at a giant 400 square feet, this tapestry, Triumph of Bacchus, teems with tiny details and hidden narratives.

      Here are just three:

      • At bottom center, Bacchus poses on the world’s largest wine fountain.
      • To the left, a sad, Eeyore-like donkey waits for satyrs and men to unload grapes from his back.
      • To the right, a rowdy monkey rides a camel that carries wooden barrels—presumably to be filled with wine.

      The tapestry is one of the highlights of the exhibition Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV. (L.A. folks: final weekend!)

      More on The Iris: A Tour of the Triumph of Bacchus

      Triumph of Bacchus (overall view and details), about 1560, design by Giovanni da Udine under the supervision of Raphael; woven at the workshop of Frans Geubels, Brussels. Wool, silk, and gilt metal-wrapped thread. Courtesy of Le Mobilier National. Image © Le Mobilier National. Photo by Lawrence Perquis

      04/29/16

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