provenance

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

“Who is this man named J. P. Getty?” M. Knoedler & Co. and Getty the Collector

Portrait of James Christie (1730 - 1803)
Portrait of James Christie, 1778, Thomas Gainsborough. Oil on canvas, 50 1/4 x 40 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of J. Paul Getty, 70.PA.16

J. Paul Getty, the mysterious art hunter. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Database of Knoedler Gallery Stock Books Now Online

Scan of a Knoedler stock book
Scan of a Knoedler stock book noting inventory of paintings by Moreau, Gérôme, and others. The Getty Research Institute, 2012.M.54

New online: searchable records from the 19th-century stock books of famed art dealers Knoedler Gallery. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Life Before eBay: British Art Auctions at the End of the 18th Century

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A major new project traces the rise of the British art market in the late 1700s. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Research

Six Questions for Art Detective Victoria Reed

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What does a provenance researcher do? And how does she do it? More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Publications, Research

New Online Resource to Reveal Stories about Nazi-Looted Art, Wartime Art Market

Paintings in storage at the Munich Central Collecting Point / Johannes Felbermeyer
Paintings in storage at the Munich Central Collecting Point, ca. 1945–49, Johannes Felbermeyer. This was one of several sites used by the Allies to identify, photograph, and restitute Nazi-seized artworks after the war. Photo Study Collection. The Getty Research Institute, 89.P.4

Featuring over 2,000 newly digitized catalogs, a new database will revolutionize Nazi-era art research. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Nazis Collecting Art: Art Dealer Gustav Cramer’s Wartime Records

Postcard showing the interior of Galerie G. Cramer in The Hague, circa 1967

A rare resource for the study of the art market in Europe during World War II is now available for research at the Getty Research Institute: the correspondence of Gustav Cramer and his son Hans Max Cramer, owners of the G. Cramer… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Creating an Online Collaboration Tool for Scholars

Digital Mellini screenshot

Last month, I gave a presentation with my colleague Tina Shah at the annual Museum Computer Network (MCN) conference in Atlanta about an online collaboration tool for scholars that several of us in the Web group at the Getty have… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Objects and Memories: Edmund de Waal on Tracing a Family Collection

Albert Cahen d’Anvers, Pierre Auguste Renoir, 1881. The J. Paul Getty Museum. The portrait was sold by the Cahen d’Anvers family to a Swiss gallery in 1971.

When you visit a museum, it’s easy to forget that objects have a story, a journey from where they began to where they are now. Take Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s portrait of the composer Albert Cahen d’Anvers. It’s one of the most… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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