Art, Getty Center

Art Takes a Rest as Getty Center Closes for Carmageddon II

Portrait of Raymond de Magnoncourt / Chasseriau

Portrait of Raymond de Magnoncourt, 1851, Théodore Chassériau. Pencil heightened with white chalk, 8 5/8 x 10 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 96.GD.337

The Getty Center will not be open for gentleman or lady callers this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, September 29 and 30. Our social calendar is affected by the demolition of the Mulholland Drive Bridge, which requires the 405 freeway to be closed from the 10 to the 101. Instead, the art will be taking a break from the pressures of celebrity and the hurly-burly of the social scene, relaxing and contemplating the view.

Though the Getty Center is located at the nexus of Carmageddon II, the Getty Villa will be open as usual this weekend, and won’t be affected by disaster—unless you count Mount Vesuvius destroying Pompeii in the galleries.

PS: To see the 405 at rest this weekend, check out our carmageddoncam.

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      everyartisthasabday:

      Botticelli’s Mystical Nativity was hidden for many centuries. Once found, it earned its name from both the unusual Nativity symbolism and Greek inscription at the top.

      Boticelli believed he was living through the Tribulation, which is clear in the mysterious inscription:

      This picture, at the end of the year 1500, in the troubles of Italy, I Alessandro, in the half-time after the time, painted, according to the eleventh chapter of Saint John, in the second woe of the Apocalypse, during the release of the devil for three-and-a-half years; then he shall be bound in the twelfth chapter and we shall see [him buried] as in this picture.

      It is the only surviving work with his signature.

      03/02/15

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