Art, Getty Center

Art Takes a Rest as Getty Center Closes for Carmageddon II

Portrait of Raymond de Magnoncourt / Chasseriau

Portrait of Raymond de Magnoncourt, 1851, Théodore Chassériau. Pencil heightened with white chalk, 8 5/8 x 10 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 96.GD.337

The Getty Center will not be open for gentleman or lady callers this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, September 29 and 30. Our social calendar is affected by the demolition of the Mulholland Drive Bridge, which requires the 405 freeway to be closed from the 10 to the 101. Instead, the art will be taking a break from the pressures of celebrity and the hurly-burly of the social scene, relaxing and contemplating the view.

Though the Getty Center is located at the nexus of Carmageddon II, the Getty Villa will be open as usual this weekend, and won’t be affected by disaster—unless you count Mount Vesuvius destroying Pompeii in the galleries.

PS: To see the 405 at rest this weekend, check out our carmageddoncam.

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