Getty Museum collection

Posted in Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Remembering Lewis Baltz

Lewis Baltz, Paris, 1992
Lewis Baltz standing in front of his installation, Ronde de Nuit, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 1992

The influential photographer, writer, and teacher has passed. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

The Radical Artistic Vision of Manet’s “Spring”

Spring as installed at the Getty Museum / Edouard Manet
Spring (Jeanne Demarsy), 1881, Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 29 1/8 x 20 ¼ in. The J. Paul Getty Museum

This beautiful painting contains the germ of modern art as we know it. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Meet Jeffrey Spier, the Getty Museum’s New Antiquities Chief

Getty Museum's senior curator of antiquities, Jeffrey Spier, in the East Garden at the Getty Villa
Getty Museum's senior curator of antiquities, Jeffrey Spier, in the East Garden at the Getty Villa

What the Getty Museum’s new senior curator of antiquities has on his to-do list. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Delightfully Horrifying Manuscript Illuminations

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Selections from the collection for Halloween. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

This Just In: The Sublime in the Everyday

Cookie in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland / Chris Killip
"Cookie" in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland, 1985, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 10 7/8 x 13 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.11. © Chris Killip

Chris Killip’s photographs depict hard-working people in a bleak yet visually stunning setting. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Bully Has Left the Room

Untitled / George Seeley
Untitled, about 1903, George Seeley. Platinum print, 19.2 x 24.3 cm. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 84.XM.163.3.

While James Ensor is away, Pictorialist photographs will play. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art for the Whole Body

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New tours combine movement, mindfulness, and sharing to engage with art “below the neck.” More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

Acrobatic Feats of the Ancient Wine Party

Fragmentary Mug with a Youth Drinking from a Wine Cup, 510–500 B.C., attributed to near the Theseus Painter, vase-painter; and to the Heron Class, potter. Greek, made in Athens. Terracotta, 6 1/4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 76.AE.127. Gift of Lynda and Max Palevsky
Fragmentary Mug with a Youth Drinking from a Wine Cup, 510–500 B.C., attributed to near the Theseus Painter, vase-painter; and to the Heron Class, potter. Greek, made in Athens. Terracotta, 6 1/4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 76.AE.127. Gift of Lynda and Max Palevsky

Wine makes a man do strange things. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, Manuscripts and Books, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Whale Tales and Sea Monsters

Venus on the Waves (detail), 1769, Francois Boucher. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Venus on the Waves (detail), 1769, Francois Boucher. J. Paul Getty Museum.

What is worse than a shark? Oh, that’s right. A lot. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

An Intimate View of Tokyo

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Picnic #2, 1998, Masato Seto. Silver-dye bleach print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2006.34.1. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Masato Seto

Four photographers capture an intimate view of the most populous cities in the world: Tokyo. More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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