About: Amanda Wada

As a Multicultural Undergraduate Intern this summer at the Getty Villa, I've been evaluating the ArtQuest! program, teaching Spotlight Talks in the galleries, helping out with the Villa Summer Institute, and developing an Art Odyssey tour. I'm a senior at Cal State Long Beach, majoring in art history with a focus on modern and contemporary art. My goal is to become an educator, whether in a museum or in a college teaching art history—so my next step will be to attend graduate school. A highlight of my time at college so far has been teaching in an elementary school classroom and leading students on a tour of CSULB's art museum.

Posts by Amanda

Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa

Getting to Know the Gela Krater

View of Stories of the Trojan War (Gallery 110) featuring the Mixing Vessel with Greeks Battling Amazons (the Gela Krater), Greek, 475–450 B.C., attributed to the Niobid Painter. Museo Archeologico Regionale, Agrigento, Sicily

Leading Spotlight Talks was one of my many tasks as a Multicultural Undergraduate Intern in the Education Department at the Getty Villa this summer. These talks are interactive discussions between an educator and visitors about one object at the Museum…. More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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