About: Brittany Dolph

I'm a first-year student in the UCLA/Getty Master's Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials. I completed pre-program conservation work at the National Museum of American History and National Gallery of Art, as well as archaeological fieldwork in cultural resources management for the Public Archaeology Facility at State University of New York at Binghamton. I'll be spending my summer internships at the Southwest Museum in L.A., and the Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum of Volos, Greece, and really look forward to working at both museums. In my free time, I continue to research methods for convincing Ryan Gosling to become spokesperson for the American Institute of Conservation.

Posts by Brittany

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Education, Getty Villa

Backyard Archaeology at the Villa Ranch House

Site of a training excavation at the Getty Villa for students in the UCLA/Getty conservation program

Students in the UCLA/Getty Conservation Program recently dug up ancient wall paintings buried on the grounds of the Getty Villa. Not real ones, of course—it was all part of a classroom exercise for us conservators-in-training to better understand how conservation… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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