About: Beth Guynn

I’m a senior archival cataloger at the Getty Research Institute. I catalog or supervise the cataloging of our rare photographs and photography-related archives, which range from the mid-19th-century to the present. I'm currently supervising the processing and cataloging of the recently acquired Robert Mapplethorpe Photographs and Papers, and am cataloging the Harry Lunn Papers. I co-curated the GRI exhibition Obsidian Mirror-Travels: Refracting Ancient Mexican Art and Archaeology, and have recently curated an exhibition at the Los Angeles Public Library, A Nation Emerges: the Mexican Revolution Revealed.

Posts by Beth

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Faces of the Mexican Revolution

General Francisco (Pancho) Villa / D. W. Hoffman

When we think of the Mexican Revolution, many of us probably conjure up images of Pancho Villa or Emiliano Zapata, two of the most well-known figures from the ten-year civil war (1910-1920) that raged across Mexico during the early years… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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