About: Beth Guynn

I’m a senior archival cataloger at the Getty Research Institute. I catalog or supervise the cataloging of our rare photographs and photography-related archives, which range from the mid-19th-century to the present. I'm currently supervising the processing and cataloging of the recently acquired Robert Mapplethorpe Photographs and Papers, and am cataloging the Harry Lunn Papers. I co-curated the GRI exhibition Obsidian Mirror-Travels: Refracting Ancient Mexican Art and Archaeology, and have recently curated an exhibition at the Los Angeles Public Library, A Nation Emerges: the Mexican Revolution Revealed.

Posts by Beth

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Faces of the Mexican Revolution

General Francisco (Pancho) Villa / D. W. Hoffman

When we think of the Mexican Revolution, many of us probably conjure up images of Pancho Villa or Emiliano Zapata, two of the most well-known figures from the ten-year civil war (1910-1920) that raged across Mexico during the early years… More»

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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