About: Christine Sciacca

I'm assistant curator of manuscripts at the J. Paul Getty Museum and a specialist in Italian, German, and Ethiopian illuminated manuscripts, with a special focus on liturgical and devotional books. I've curated a variety of manuscripts exhibitions at the Getty Center, including Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350, Music for the Masses: Illuminated Choir Books, Building the Medieval World: Architecture in Illuminated Manuscripts, and Shrine and Shroud: Textiles in Illuminated Manuscripts. I'm editor of the book Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350 and author of Building the Medieval World from Getty Publications.

Posts by Christine

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Meet the Artist Who Helped Launch the Renaissance in Florence

The Ascension of Christ from the Laudario of Sant’Agnese / Pacino di Bonaguida

In the early 1300s, 150 years before Leonardo and Michelangelo walked its streets, Florence was a hotbed of artistic production and creativity. Three works in the Getty Museum’s collection produced in the city at this dynamic moment—all by the same… More»

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      I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower—and a troop of tidy, happy villages please me better than the finest banditti in the world.”

      Marianne looked with amazement at Edward, with compassion at her sister. Elinor only laughed.

      —Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, published on October 30, 1811

      Wooded Landscape by Paulus Lieder and Landscape with a Bare Tree and a Ploughman by Leon Bonvin, The J. Paul Getty Museum; Fantastic Oak Tree in the Woods, Carl Wilhelm Kolbe the Elder, The Getty Research Institute

      10/30/14

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