About: Courtney Wilder

I'm a research assistant in the Collection Development department of the Getty Research Institute. My job allows me to work on a wide array of projects including exhibitions, acquisitions, setting up presentations in Special Collections, and assisting with curators' research projects. I find working with prints especially rewarding because these ephemerally inclined objects can range from the masterfully artistic to the fascinatingly amateurish. I moved west in 2009 to study art history at the University of California, Riverside, where I completed my MA in 2011.

Posts by Courtney

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Beware Cupid’s Arrow! French Print Reveals Dangers of Romantic Mix-Ups

Detail of the Exchange of Arrows Between Death and Cupid / Pierre Landry
Unlikely.

It could happen to you: comic mix-ups, near-death encounters, and other tales of accursed romance from French prints at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Buck Teeth and All: True Lies in Early Color Printing

Portrait of Edouard Dagoty, Inventor of Color Printing / Carlo Lasinio

While working on the show The Getty Research Institute: Recent Print Acquisitions (in the GRI Gallery until September 2), I had the pleasure of getting to know one Édouard Gautier-D’Agoty. Every bit the late-18th-century gentleman-artist and rendered in velvety soft… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum

Explorations in Darkness and Light: Odilon Redon

Then appears a singular being having a man’s head atop the body of a fish / Odilon Redon

My job as research assistant to Marcia Reed, chief curator at the Getty Research Institute, and Louis Marchesano, curator of prints & drawings, might be described as “research becomes eclectic.” In addition to investigating a wide array of potential acquisitions… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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