About: Courtney Wilder

I'm a research assistant in the Collection Development department of the Getty Research Institute. My job allows me to work on a wide array of projects including exhibitions, acquisitions, setting up presentations in Special Collections, and assisting with curators' research projects. I find working with prints especially rewarding because these ephemerally inclined objects can range from the masterfully artistic to the fascinatingly amateurish. I moved west in 2009 to study art history at the University of California, Riverside, where I completed my MA in 2011.

Posts by Courtney

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Beware Cupid’s Arrow! French Print Reveals Dangers of Romantic Mix-Ups

Detail of the Exchange of Arrows Between Death and Cupid / Pierre Landry
Unlikely.

It could happen to you: comic mix-ups, near-death encounters, and other tales of accursed romance from French prints at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Buck Teeth and All: True Lies in Early Color Printing

Portrait of Edouard Dagoty, Inventor of Color Printing / Carlo Lasinio

While working on the show The Getty Research Institute: Recent Print Acquisitions (in the GRI Gallery until September 2), I had the pleasure of getting to know one Édouard Gautier-D’Agoty. Every bit the late-18th-century gentleman-artist and rendered in velvety soft… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum

Explorations in Darkness and Light: Odilon Redon

Then appears a singular being having a man’s head atop the body of a fish / Odilon Redon

My job as research assistant to Marcia Reed, chief curator at the Getty Research Institute, and Louis Marchesano, curator of prints & drawings, might be described as “research becomes eclectic.” In addition to investigating a wide array of potential acquisitions… More»

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      Eye-to-eye with a mystery man.

      He closely resembles painter Francois Boucher, whose eyes rendered paintings like this one

      In 18th century France, terracotta busts were popular additions to the home as they were relatively inexpensive, and fit for both middle class and wealthy consumers.

      See the full picture here.

      Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

      Bust of a Man, about 1760, Attributed to Jean-Jacques Caffieri. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      10/01/14

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