About: Laura Dominguez and Suzanne Noruschat

Laura Dominguez I've been a library assistant in special collections cataloging at the Getty Research Institute since March 2011, processing the papers and drawings of architects Ray Kappe and William Krisel. I have a B.A. in architectural history from Columbia University, and I am currently a second year student in the Master of Historic Preservation program at the University of Southern California. My research interests include the California Arts and Crafts movement, midcentury modernism and culture in Los Angeles, and more recent developments of cultural heritage and preservation movements in ethnic enclaves. Suzanne Noruschat I’m a library assistant in special collections cataloging at the Getty Research Institute. I’m responsible for processing and cataloging two collections of architecture records, the papers and drawings of Los Angeles architects Ray Kappe and William Krisel. I recently completed a master’s degree in Library and Information Science at the University of California, Los Angeles, with a specialization in archival studies. I also hold a Ph.D. in architectural history from Emory University and have taught art and architectural history for almost a decade.

Posts by Laura Dominguez and

Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Ray Kappe, Green Architecture Pioneer and SCI-ARC Founder

Architectural rendering of the Kappe residence. Ray Kappe papers, drawings, and models. The Getty Research Institute, 2008.M.36
Architectural rendering of the Kappe residence. Pacific Palisades, California. Ray Kappe, architect. Ray Kappe papers. Gift of Ray Kappe. The Getty Research Institute, 2008.M.36

Researchers interested in studying post-World War II architecture in Southern California will be excited to learn that a new archive is now fully catalogued and available for study: the Ray Kappe papers. The collection, part of the Getty Research Institute’s… More»

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      ryanlintelman:

      thegetty:

      On this day in history, a British colonial magistrate in India began using fingerprints as identifiers. It is considered the first official use of nature’s signature.

      Can you find the painter’s accidental fingerprint on this Classical Athenian mug fragment? Click through for a close up!

      Are you kidding me, Getty? This post is about the fingerprint on this mug? How about WHAT THE F**K IS THIS GUY DOING?

      Good point. We asked our antiquities expert and here’s what he said!

      08/27/14

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