About: Annette Doss and Katie Duvall

Annette Doss I've been a cataloger at the Getty Research Institute since 2009. I was the lead archivist on the Robert Mapplethorpe archive project between 2011 and 2012. Prior to that, I catalogued the Long Beach Museum of Art Video Archive and other audiovisual collections. I hold a master's in Library and Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a B.A. in Art History from Loyola Marymount University. My research interests include video art preservation and how libraries, archives, and museums work collaboratively to provide integrated access to their collections. Katie Duvall I was a library assistant in special collections cataloging at the Getty Research Institute, processing and cataloging the Robert Mapplethorpe papers and photographs. I currently work in the institutional records and archives department at the Research Institute where I help preserve the current and historical records of all of the Getty's programs (the Museum, the Research Institute, the Conservation Institute, the Trust, and the Foundation). I have a master's degree in Library and Information Science, with a specialization in archival studies, from the University of California, Los Angeles and a B.S. in Film from Boston University.

Posts by Annette Doss and

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Treasures from the Vault: Robert Mapplethorpe Papers and Photographs

Self-portrait / Robert Mapplethorpe
Gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Held at the Getty Research Institute

After much anticipation, the Robert Mapplethorpe archive is now available at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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      William Pope.L

      Tell us a bit about how and why you became an artist.

      I used to blame my being an artist on my grandmother, but that was my younger self looking for a scapegoat. At one point in undergrad, I had a moment, a crisis where I thought it was my job to save my family and the best way to that was to be a commercial artist—but I had to let go of that. Truth be told, being an artist is something I choose every day. Of course, maybe I choose art because I’m afraid of theater—too much memorizing and being in the moment and shit.

      A lot of your work deals with racial issues—perceptions of “blackness,” “whiteness,” the absurdity of racial prejudices, the violence of it. Why do you address race in your work? Do you think art can be an agent of change?

      I address race in my work ‘cause day-to-day in our country it addresses me. Yes, art can change the world but so can Disney—so there is that. I think the real question is not can art change the world, but can art be changed by the world? Would we allow this?

      Humor, with a touch of the absurd, seems to be an important component in your artistic practice. What role does humor play in your work?

      I like to use humor in my work ‘cause it answers/deals with questions in ways that are very unique. Humor answers questions with an immediacy and creates a productive amnesia of the moment in the receiver—but then the wave recedes, the world floods back in with its pain, confusions, and crush but the humor remains like a perfume or an echo or a kiss inside beneath one’s skin.

      More: Artist William Pope.L on Humor, Race, and God

      From top: Obi Sunt (Production Image from the making of Obi Sunt), 2015, William Pope.L. Courtesy of the Artist © Pope.L; Gans-Nelson fight, from the album ‘Incident to the Gans-Nelson fight’ (Page 40-3), Goldfield, NV, September 3, 1906, William Pope.L. Courtesy of Steve Turner and the Artist; Tour People, 2005, William Pope.L. Courtesy of the Artist © Pope.L; Failure Drawing #301, NYU/Napkin, Rocket Crash, William Pope.L. Courtesy of the Artist © Pope.L.


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