About: Eidelriz Senga

I'm senior project coordinator in the Education Department of the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa and have worked at the Getty since 2005. I earned my bachelor’s degree in art history from the University of Southern California. I oversee a touchable teaching curriculum for gallery teaching programs, Handling Sessions, a drop-in gallery program inviting visitors to touch museum materials, studio courses for adults, and artist-at-work demonstrations. I also teach in the galleries and always strive to encourage experiential and multisensory learning for all audiences.

Posts by Eidelriz

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa

What Did Ancient Music Sound Like?

Sarcophagus with Scenes of Bacchus / Roman

Ancient works of art illustrate that music had a strong presence in daily life of classical Greece and Rome. Vase paintings and sculptures in the antiquities collection offer an eye-opening view of the variety of musical instruments that were played, as… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Touching Experience: Exploring Art with Blind and Low Sighted Visitors

Participants explore the different textures in the Touch Statue. In the photo at the top of the post, a participant feels marble in its natural form.
Participants explore the different textures in the Touch Statue. In the photo at the top of the post, a participant feels marble in its natural form.

I wouldn’t have become a museum educator if I didn’t believe in the potential magic of an art museum. I’ve had enough experiences at the Getty Villa to know that I’m not crazy—that special experiences can be had with works… More»

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      Photography of Troubled Dreams

      Japanese photographer Shiga Lieko works with local communities, immersing herself in them and incorporating their histories and myths into her photographs. Her series Rasen Kaigan (Spiral Shore) was created between 2009 and 2012 in Kitakama, Japan, a coastal village devastated by the earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011. The images possess a dreamlike, postapocalyptic quality that evokes myth, natural disaster, and trauma.

      Six from the series are included in the exhibition The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography (through February 21).

      Three images from Shiga Lieko’s series Rasen Kaigan (Spiral Shore), from top: Rasen Kaigan 39 and Portrait of Cultivation, 2009; Rasen Kaigan 21, 2012. Chromogenic prints. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2015.1.2.–.4 © Shiga Lieko

      02/13/16

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