About: Eidelriz Senga

I'm senior project coordinator in the Education Department of the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa and have worked at the Getty since 2005. I earned my bachelor’s degree in art history from the University of Southern California. I oversee a touchable teaching curriculum for gallery teaching programs, Handling Sessions, a drop-in gallery program inviting visitors to touch museum materials, studio courses for adults, and artist-at-work demonstrations. I also teach in the galleries and always strive to encourage experiential and multisensory learning for all audiences.

Posts by Eidelriz

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa

What Did Ancient Music Sound Like?

Sarcophagus with Scenes of Bacchus / Roman

Ancient works of art illustrate that music had a strong presence in daily life of classical Greece and Rome. Vase paintings and sculptures in the antiquities collection offer an eye-opening view of the variety of musical instruments that were played, as… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Touching Experience: Exploring Art with Blind and Low Sighted Visitors

Participants explore the different textures in the Touch Statue. In the photo at the top of the post, a participant feels marble in its natural form.
Participants explore the different textures in the Touch Statue. In the photo at the top of the post, a participant feels marble in its natural form.

I wouldn’t have become a museum educator if I didn’t believe in the potential magic of an art museum. I’ve had enough experiences at the Getty Villa to know that I’m not crazy—that special experiences can be had with works… More»

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      gettypubs:

      MAUVE

      Mauve is the first modern synthetic dye, but its discovery in 1856 was not intentional.

      Given the assignment to find a cure for malaria using coal tar, 18-year-old William Henry Perkins, a student at the Royal College of Chemistry, did not succeed in finding a revolutionary medicine, but instead noticed that he was left with a beautifully-colored residue.

      Perkins would file his first patent for the color in 1857 and his coal tar dye would go on to become all the rage, even a color of choice for Queen Victoria. 

      Find out more about mauve and other early dyes and pigments in The Brilliant History of Color in Art!

      Mauve sample from The American Practical Dyer’s Companion, 1882, E. J. Bird. Getty Research Institute. 

      01/26/15

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