About: Francesca Albrezzi

I’m the research assistant to Murtha Baca, head of Digital Art History at the Getty Research Institute. Within the Digital Mellini project, I’ve served as a project manager, data integrator, and art historical researcher. I’m continuing to collaborate and assist in the production of the Scholars’ Workspace and its individual projects. As a PhD student in the department of World Arts and Cultures at UCLA, my work involves looking at technology as it shapes culture today, particularly in the discipline and practice of art history, through the lens of Culture and Performance Studies, as well as through other various theoretical frameworks.

Posts by Francesca

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Manuscripts and Books, Research, Voices

Creating “Getty Scholars’ Workspace”: Lessons from the Digital Humanities Trenches

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Getty Scholars’ Workspace, an online collaborative working environment, is taking shape at the Getty Research Institute. Lessons from the pilot project. More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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