About: Juliane Wattig

I received my diploma from the Cologne Institute for Conservation Sciences (CICS), Germany. I specialize in treating 20th-century art and mixed-media objects and am interested in ways of making, preserving, storing, and presenting art, communicating with the public, and enhancing conservation knowledge through collaboration among colleagues in related professions including scientists, curators, designers, artists, and manufacturers. Currently, I am employed at the Getty Research Institute (GRI), where I preserve objects from the broad special collections, such as the Jean Brown Collection, the Architecture and Design Collection, and the Editions for PARKETT.

Posts by Juliane

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Lifted Cellulose Nitrate: Conserving an Early Robert Mapplethorpe Object

Untitled box / Robert Mapplethorpe
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

A conservator’s view of a complex and unusual object by Robert Mapplethorpe. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Conserving Architectural Models: Behind the Scenes in the Research Institute Conservation Lab

Tom Learner and Juliane Wattig, working on an architectural model
Photo: Scott S. Warren

How are architectural models conserved? A look at the field, and two displayed in “Overdrive.” More»

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      What did death mean in Ancient life?

      An exhibition that looks at death and funerary practice through thirteen elaborate Apulian vases from Southern Italy now on view in Dangerous Perfection: Funerary Vases from Southern Italy!

      Funerary Vessel , South Italian, from Apulia, 340-310 B.C., terracotta red-figured volute krater< attributed to the Phrixos Group. Image © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

      Funerary Vessel, South Italian, from Apulia, 350-325 B.C., terracotta red figured amphora attributed to the Darius Painter (the Hecuba Sub-Group).Image © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

      11/22/14

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