About: Juliane Wattig

I received my diploma from the Cologne Institute for Conservation Sciences (CICS), Germany. I specialize in treating 20th-century art and mixed-media objects and am interested in ways of making, preserving, storing, and presenting art, communicating with the public, and enhancing conservation knowledge through collaboration among colleagues in related professions including scientists, curators, designers, artists, and manufacturers. Currently, I am employed at the Getty Research Institute (GRI), where I preserve objects from the broad special collections, such as the Jean Brown Collection, the Architecture and Design Collection, and the Editions for PARKETT.

Posts by Juliane

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Lifted Cellulose Nitrate: Conserving an Early Robert Mapplethorpe Object

Untitled box / Robert Mapplethorpe
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

A conservator’s view of a complex and unusual object by Robert Mapplethorpe. More»

Tagged , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Conserving Architectural Models: Behind the Scenes in the Research Institute Conservation Lab

Tom Learner and Juliane Wattig, working on an architectural model
Photo: Scott S. Warren

How are architectural models conserved? A look at the field, and two displayed in “Overdrive.” More»

Tagged , , , , , , , 3 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      JAMES WELLING

      Artists in Light, Paper, Process connect to the history of photography in a tangible way. All seven of the artists in the show work with repetition, seeking to uncover how a similar technique or gesture can lead to unexpected results.

      For his sinuous Water series, James Welling plunged sheets of photographic paper into a basin, achieving through this simple act a remarkable variety of shapes, tones, and colors. “It’s the same gesture again and again, with each result different,” explained our photographs curator. “It’s not about achieving the perfect image one time only, but about mastering the gesture and seeing its diverse realizations.”


      Water, 2009, James Welling, chromogenic print. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles. © James Welling

      07/30/15

  • Flickr