About: Juliane Wattig

I received my diploma from the Cologne Institute for Conservation Sciences (CICS), Germany. I specialize in treating 20th-century art and mixed-media objects and am interested in ways of making, preserving, storing, and presenting art, communicating with the public, and enhancing conservation knowledge through collaboration among colleagues in related professions including scientists, curators, designers, artists, and manufacturers. Currently, I am employed at the Getty Research Institute (GRI), where I preserve objects from the broad special collections, such as the Jean Brown Collection, the Architecture and Design Collection, and the Editions for PARKETT.

Posts by Juliane

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Lifted Cellulose Nitrate: Conserving an Early Robert Mapplethorpe Object

Untitled box / Robert Mapplethorpe
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

A conservator’s view of a complex and unusual object by Robert Mapplethorpe. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Conserving Architectural Models: Behind the Scenes in the Research Institute Conservation Lab

Tom Learner and Juliane Wattig, working on an architectural model
Photo: Scott S. Warren

How are architectural models conserved? A look at the field, and two displayed in “Overdrive.” More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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