About: Julie Wolfe

I'm an associate conservator in decorative art and sculpture conservation at the Getty Museum. I have worked at the Getty for twelve years, and love working on exhibitions: every time, there is the challenge to learn something new. I trained at Buffalo State College in art conservation with advanced training at Harvard University Art Museums.

Posts by Julie

Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Revitalizing Barbara Hepworth’s Figure for Landscape

Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.
Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.

A behind-the-scenes look at restoring Barbara Hepworth’s 1960 sculpture “Figure for Landscape.” More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Case of the Broken Wax Banana

Untitled with broken peel / Robert Graham

This is the third in a series of conservators’ reflections on artworks in Pacific Standard Time. Robert Graham’s sculpture Untitled came to the Museum last October for Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture 1950-1970. It’s a small wax banana resting… More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Art with an On-Off Switch: Restoring Stephan von Heune’s Tap Dancer

Tap Dancer by Stephan van Huene, with base panels removed to reveal components inside base

This is the first in a series of conservator’s reflections on artworks in Pacific Standard Time. Stephan van Huene is recognized for his acoustical sculptures—which he called “machines”—that combine movement and sound. With the flip of a switch, the sculpture… More»

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      ancientpeoples:

      Gold snake bracelet, worn on the wrist

      Romano-Egyptian, 3rd - 2nd century B.C. 

      Source: The J. Paul Getty Museum

      In the Hellenistic period, gold made available by new territorial conquests flooded the Greek world. 

      Combined with social and economic changes that created a wealthy clientele with a taste for luxury, this availability led to an immense outpouring of gold jewelry to meet the demand.

      Here’s a closer view of the detailing of the cross-hatching.

      05/05/16

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