About: Julie Wolfe

I'm an associate conservator in decorative art and sculpture conservation at the Getty Museum. I have worked at the Getty for twelve years, and love working on exhibitions: every time, there is the challenge to learn something new. I trained at Buffalo State College in art conservation with advanced training at Harvard University Art Museums.

Posts by Julie

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Revitalizing Barbara Hepworth’s Figure for Landscape

Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.
Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.

A behind-the-scenes look at restoring Barbara Hepworth’s 1960 sculpture “Figure for Landscape.” More»

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Posted in Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Case of the Broken Wax Banana

Untitled with broken peel / Robert Graham

This is the third in a series of conservators’ reflections on artworks in Pacific Standard Time. Robert Graham’s sculpture Untitled came to the Museum last October for Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture 1950-1970. It’s a small wax banana resting… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Art with an On-Off Switch: Restoring Stephan von Heune’s Tap Dancer

Tap Dancer by Stephan van Huene, with base panels removed to reveal components inside base

This is the first in a series of conservator’s reflections on artworks in Pacific Standard Time. Stephan van Huene is recognized for his acoustical sculptures—which he called “machines”—that combine movement and sound. With the flip of a switch, the sculpture… More»

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      Studying anything at a museum gives me a peek into what might have gone through the minds of other creatives. Being with the art in person, I am able to capture so much more with my eyes than what I would from studying a photograph. The sensation you get when looking at a piece in real life is incomparable. I would recommend to any artist, if possible, studying real pieces up close before just diving into studying photos.

      —Artist @franklinlei, profiled for our #GettyInspired series today on the Iris

      Pages from Franklin’s notebook with sketches of Bernini’s Bust of Pope Paul V and Riccio’s Virgin and Child at the Getty Museum

      02/11/16

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