About: Kenneth Lapatin

I'm associate curator of antiquities at the J. Paul Getty Museum, specializing in Greek and Roman art. In 2009 I curated the exhibition Carvers and Collectors: The Lasting Allure of Ancient Gems at the Getty Villa and was guest curator of Pompeii and the Roman Villa: Art and Culture around the Bay of Naples at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Currently I'm developing exhibitions on the modern reception of Pompeii and other sites destroyed by Mount Vesuvius, a Roman silver treasure from France, and monumental Hellenistic bronze statuary.

Posts by Kenneth

Posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum

In Search of the Berthouville Treasure

Map of France showing the relative locations of Paris and Berthouville

The present whereabouts of the Berthouville Treasure are not a mystery. In December 2011 this priceless hoard of ancient Roman artifacts discovered by chance in the French countryside over 180 years ago was temporarily transferred from its permanent home in the… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, Scholarship

Deciphering the Getty Hexameters

hexameters_workshop
Jens Daehner, associate curator of antiquities (left), and Sarah Morris, professor of classics and archaeology at UCLA (right), take a close look at the Getty Hexameters.

Scholars from as far away as England and Holland and as near as Westwood recently gathered at the Getty Villa to decipher and discuss an enigmatic ancient Greek text inscribed on a now-fragmentary lead tablet. These so-called “Getty Hexameters” date… More»

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      Color for Healing

      This sanitorium (tuberculosis hospital) in Paimio, Finland, was designed by architect Alvar Aalto in the 1920s. Unlike many hospitals, it was full of bright colors—including welcoming yellow on the main stairs and calming green for ceilings above bedridden patients. Aalto even created special chairs to open the chest and speed healing.

      The building’s colors were mostly whitewashed later in the 20th century, but now—due to a grant from the Getty Foundation as part of its Keeping It Modern initiative—its colors are being reconstructed and the building preserved for the future.

      More of the story: Saving Alvar Aalto’s Paimio Sanitorium

      Pictured: Paimio Sanatorium, patients’ wing and solarium terraces. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum. A color model for Paimio Sanatorium interiors by decorative artist Eino Kauria. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum, 2016.Paimio chairs (Artek no 41) in the Paimio Sanatorium lecture room, 1930s. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum. Aino Aalto resting in a chair on the solarium terrace. Photo: Alvar Aalto, Alvar Aalto Museum, 1930s. Main stairs of Paimio Sanatorium. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum.

      04/30/16

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