About: Kim N. Richter

I'm a research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, a scholar of Pre-Columbian art history, and co-curator of the exhibition Connecting Seas: A Visual History of Discoveries and Encounters. I have also studied Classical and Modern Nahuatl and Teenek (a Mayan language from northeastern Mexico).

Posts by Kim

Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, technology, Voices

Encounters with Indigenous Mexico | Getty Voices

The Zocalo, Mexico City / Cartas de relacion
The Zócalo, Mexico City's main square, depicted soon after the Spanish Conquest. Detail from Tenochtitlan, woodcut in Hernán Cortés, Cartas de relación (Nuremberg, 1524). The Getty Research Institute, 93-B9631

“There is so much to think over that I do not know how to describe it, seeing things as we did that had never been heard of or seen before, not even dreamed about.” More»

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      Clocking in at a giant 400 square feet, this tapestry, Triumph of Bacchus, teems with tiny details and hidden narratives.

      Here are just three:

      • At bottom center, Bacchus poses on the world’s largest wine fountain.
      • To the left, a sad, Eeyore-like donkey waits for satyrs and men to unload grapes from his back.
      • To the right, a rowdy monkey rides a camel that carries wooden barrels—presumably to be filled with wine.

      The tapestry is one of the highlights of the exhibition Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV. (L.A. folks: final weekend!)

      More on The Iris: A Tour of the Triumph of Bacchus

      Triumph of Bacchus (overall view and details), about 1560, design by Giovanni da Udine under the supervision of Raphael; woven at the workshop of Frans Geubels, Brussels. Wool, silk, and gilt metal-wrapped thread. Courtesy of Le Mobilier National. Image © Le Mobilier National. Photo by Lawrence Perquis

      04/29/16

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