About: Leslie Friedman

I've been a project specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) since 2009, working mainly on the MOSAIKON Initiative. I'm an architectural conservator specializing in the conservation of archaeological sites and decorative surface finishes. I have a background in archaeology and anthropology, and am an expert member of ICAHM, the ICOMOS International Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management. I previously worked for the GCI as a graduate intern (2006–2007), at ICOMOS, at the U.S. National Park Service, and as an independent conservator in private practice. Some of my previous projects have included the ancient site of Gordion in Turkey, 16th-century wall paintings in Puerto Rico, a 19th-century Mughal palace in India, the World Heritage site of Mesa Verde, Spanish colonial adobe architecture in California, and the historic city of Jaffa.

Posts by Leslie

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Philanthropy

Paving the Way: Mosaic Conservation Training in the Mediterranean Region

MOSAIKON course participants at the site of Herculaneum, Italy, preparing and presenting a site exercise on planning priority conservation interventions.

The Getty Conservation Institute recently completed the first training course for MOSAIKON, an ambitious collaboration dedicated to improving the  conservation and maintenance of ancient mosaics in the Mediterranean region. Begun in 2008, MOSAIKON is a partnership between the Conservation Institute,… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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