About: Lucy Bradnock

I joined the Getty Research Institute in September 2009 as a postdoctoral fellow, working on the Pacific Standard Time research initiative. I moved to Los Angeles directly after finishing my PhD at the University of Essex, UK, and will be here until 2011. I'm relishing this opportunity to extend my research, which focuses on California artists and poets in the 1950s, and to contribute to all aspects of the project, including the exhibition, publications, and related events.

Posts by Lucy

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Publications, Research

The Getty Research Journal: Diverse, Collaborative, International

Cover of the Getty Research Journal, issue 3 (2011) featuring Brian O'Doherty's Tatlin Squared

The third issue of the Getty Research Journal has just been published. Each year, the Journal presents new research on the Getty’s broad holdings and highlights the diverse interests of our staff and scholars. The journal’s goal is to share… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Avant-Garde Antics: The Art of Display in Postwar Los Angeles

Wallace Berman’s gallery in Larkspur. Photo by Charles Brittin. Research Library, The Getty Research Institute, 2005.M.11

How do you hold a “secret exhibition”? In 1957, Los Angeles artist George Herms did just that, setting up his assemblage sculptures among the foundation blocks of a row of demolished buildings in Hermosa Beach. The show wasn’t publicized, and… More»

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      everyartisthasabday:

      Botticelli’s Mystical Nativity was hidden for many centuries. Once found, it earned its name from both the unusual Nativity symbolism and Greek inscription at the top.

      Boticelli believed he was living through the Tribulation, which is clear in the mysterious inscription:

      This picture, at the end of the year 1500, in the troubles of Italy, I Alessandro, in the half-time after the time, painted, according to the eleventh chapter of Saint John, in the second woe of the Apocalypse, during the release of the devil for three-and-a-half years; then he shall be bound in the twelfth chapter and we shall see [him buried] as in this picture.

      It is the only surviving work with his signature.

      03/02/15

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