About: Laura Cogburn

I'm a grants management and database specialist with the Getty Foundation. I received my B.A. in art history from Scripps College in Claremont, California, attended the graduate program in Art History and Museum Studies at the University of Southern California, and have a M.L.I.S. from San José State University. I worked for many years supporting the administration of the Getty Foundation’s international giving program in the conservation of art and architecture, and I currently focus on improving systems to manage grantmaking, and am collaborating with other foundations to gather and aggregate data about philanthropy. I've made a pilgrimage to the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch, New Zealand, to see artifacts from the heroic age of Antarctic Exploration and hope someday to visit Sir Ernest Shackleton’s grave in South Georgia Island.

Posts by Laura

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Christmas at the South Pole: Conserving Sites of Antarctic Exploration

Ernest Shackleton's 1908 Nimrod expedition base, Cape Royds
Ernest Shackleton's 1908 Nimrod expedition base, Cape Royds. © Antarctic Heritage Trust, nzaht.org

“The last view of civilization, the last sight of fields, and trees, and flowers, had come and gone on Christmas Eve, 1901, and as the night fell, the blue outline of friendly New Zealand was lost to us in the… More»

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      Masked Harlequin, the commedia dell’arte’s leading man, lures an innocent, elegantly dressed young lady into the world of prostitution. She’s caught the eye of a displeased young man, dressed in dapper clothes. They stand out in this scene of costumed characters in exaggerated clothing. 

      Gillot’s light, quick brushstrokes mimics the satirical subject and lighthearted portrayal of human folly.

      Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

      Scene from the Italian Comedy (recto), about 1700, Claude Gillot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      07/25/14

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