About: Laura Cogburn

I'm a grants management and database specialist with the Getty Foundation. I received my B.A. in art history from Scripps College in Claremont, California, attended the graduate program in Art History and Museum Studies at the University of Southern California, and have a M.L.I.S. from San José State University. I worked for many years supporting the administration of the Getty Foundation’s international giving program in the conservation of art and architecture, and I currently focus on improving systems to manage grantmaking, and am collaborating with other foundations to gather and aggregate data about philanthropy. I've made a pilgrimage to the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch, New Zealand, to see artifacts from the heroic age of Antarctic Exploration and hope someday to visit Sir Ernest Shackleton’s grave in South Georgia Island.

Posts by Laura

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Christmas at the South Pole: Conserving Sites of Antarctic Exploration

Ernest Shackleton's 1908 Nimrod expedition base, Cape Royds
Ernest Shackleton's 1908 Nimrod expedition base, Cape Royds. © Antarctic Heritage Trust, nzaht.org

“The last view of civilization, the last sight of fields, and trees, and flowers, had come and gone on Christmas Eve, 1901, and as the night fell, the blue outline of friendly New Zealand was lost to us in the… More»

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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